Mirza Teletovic showing everyone what he's capable of doing

Nets' Mirza Teletovic reacts after hitting a three-pointer

Nets' Mirza Teletovic reacts after hitting a three-pointer against the Miami Heat in the third quarter of Game 3 in the second round of the NBA playoffs at Barclays Center on Saturday, May 10, 2014. Photo Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams, Jr.

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Don't think Mirza Teletovic was confident in his scoring abilities long before this Eastern Conference semifinal series?

Let him explain it.

"Check me out on YouTube, man,'' Teletovic said before the Nets took on the Heat in Game 4 Monday night.

Before joining the Nets two summers ago, the Bosnian native made a name for himself in Europe. But what he did through the first three games of this series has turned the heads of those who weren't aware of his fearless approach and knack for hoisting shots from anywhere on the court.

Teletovic had only four points in Game 4, but he had been averaging 12.3 points in the series. He had hit 11 of 19 attempts from three-point range and was the lone reserve on any team in this postseason to nail at least four threes in consecutive games.

"For me it's important to make one shot,'' Teletovic said, "Once I make one shot, I know it.''

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Entering Game 4, Heat coach Erik Spoelstra knew that Miami's defense on Teletovic had to improve. He also knew how important it was for the Heat to not let him get that confidence going and find a rhythm. But for Spoelstra, it was about more than hoping the Heat would make adjustments.

"Hope doesn't win you playoff games,'' Spoelstra said, "You do have to own and take responsibility. He's on a great roll right now. He's a big shooter. He's 6-9, so he can get it off above your normal closeout.

"We've faced great shooters before where we've had to make adjustments and make better effort, better awareness. It's the playoffs and that's what it is going to take. It will take more, bottom line.''


Net-ceteraJason Kidd on the difference between making adjustments as a coach as opposed to being on the floor in uniform: "Oh, as a player, it's easy,'' he said with a laugh. "You listen to what the coach has to say and you go out and do your job."

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