Here's a release from Long Island Amateur Boxing Championships and Charities Inc.:

The Daily News Golden Gloves will be hosted by the Long Island Amateur Boxing Championships and Charities Inc. (LIABC&C) at the Five Towns Community Center. 

The Five Towns Community Center is located at 270 Lawrence Ave, in Lawrence, Long Island and the event will take place on February 17, 2010.  The New York Daily News Golden Gloves is the longest running Amateur Boxing Tournament that has produced some of our nation's greatest boxing championships.  The legionary and longest reining Golden Gloves Champion Mark Breland and former Golden Gloves and World number one ranked heavy weight contender Gerry Cooney will be in attendance at our February 17 event.  Come and see the future greats of the sport of boxing.  Other specially invited guests are boxing legend Johnny and Eddy Davis (a.k.a the Davis brothers of the 1980s), Veto Antuofermo, Emile Griffith, and Iran
Barkley.

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Proceeds from this show will go toward the LIABC&C's scholarship fund and victims of the Haitian Earth Quake.  The LIABC&C was established by Michael Carryl in 2005 to promote and encourage young boxers toward the pursuit of academic excellence.  Most recently, the LIABC&C scholarship recipients are Edgar Sanchez ,whom is currently a pre-Physical Therapy major and student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and Patrick Day currently a senior at Freeport High School .  Mr. Day plans to enroll in College this fall and pursue a degree in Psychology.

Money raised for the victims of the Haitian Earth Quake will be donated to OMAT (Overseas Medical Assistance Team, www.omatmission.org) who have been providing free medical care  to the people of Haiti for more than 10 years.  Dr. Stephen Carryl, Director of Surgery  at the Brooklyn Medical Center, is the founder, and director of OMAT.  He took his team  of medical professionals to Haiti within forty eight hours following the earth quake to provide the much needed medical care.  Since 1999, Dr. Carryl and his team of medical professionals who volunteer their services and received no compensation have visited Haiti at least once a year and provided free medical care for those who could least afford the greatly needed services.