Will Rosinsky knows a little bit about pressure. He's fought on HBO and Showtime and has traded punches with former world champion Kelly Pavlik. But for the light heavyweight from Ozone Park, the real pressure is his day job.

Rosinky, 30, is a member of the New York City Fire Department assigned to Engine Company 234 in Brooklyn. He said his boxing career helped prepare him for life as a firefighter.

"It's a very similar adrenaline rush," said Rosinsky. "You have to keep yourself calm in a very stressful situation. Obviously, when you respond to a fire it's a life and death situation. You can't compare that to a boxing match. But in both situations, you have to stay calm and rely on your training."

Rosinsky (18-2, 10 KOs) fights Shujaa El Amin (12-6, 6 KOs) in the 10-round main event Saturday night at Resorts World Casino in Queens. The card also features an excellent women's matchup as Brooklyn's Keisher McLeod-Wells (7-2, 1 KO) fights Queens' Patricia Alcivar (8-3, 3 KOs) for the vacant New York State flyweight title. The pair met in 2012 and McLeod-Wells won a split decision.

Rosinsky, a four-time Golden Gloves champion, grew up just a few blocks from Aqueduct Racetrack and this marks the first time in his career that he will fight in his home borough. He said that while boxing is a solitary sport, the comraderie of the firehouse has afforded him a built-in support system.

"When you are a firefighter, you are basically trusting these guys with your life and they are trusting you with theirs," he said. "That's a special bond. Yeah, I get some ribbing at the firehouse, they all think they can beat me up. But, really, the support they give me is great. I expect a lot of them to be at the fight. I know there can be a lot of added pressure fighting in front of your hometown fans, but I am really looking forward to this."

El Amin, from Flint, Michigan, has previously fought current light heavyweight champion Adonis Stevenson and rising contender Jesse Hart. But he's been inactive for nearly a year.

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"He's a tough guy," Rosinsky said. "He always comes to fight. Right now, he has some ring rust and I am going to help him knock that off. I just want to get a title shot. I want to get myself back on television and get back into a big fight so I can prove myself. I still have a lot to show people in the ring."

He starts by showing his hometown fans on Saturday night.