Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly won't lobby for BCS title game

Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly, right, questions

Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly, right, questions field judge Ben Vasconcells as a play is reviewed during the first half of a game against the Pittsburgh in South Bend, Ind. (Nov. 3, 2012) (Credit: AP)

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SOUTH BEND, Ind. -- Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly has a degree in political science and has worked on a presidential campaign, but has no interest in lobbying for a spot for the fourth-ranked Fighting Irish in the national championship game.

Kelly said yesterday that's because he doesn't think it would help the Irish, who are 9-0 for the first time since 1993.

"If it helped, you know me, I could talk all day. If it really helped, I would be on the stump for it. But it doesn't do anything," he said. "The only thing that does is winning football games, so I try spend all my time and energy focused on how we can get another win and getting to 10."

That doesn't appear to be that difficult, considering the opponent Saturday is Boston College (2-7), with only one win against FBS opponents. But the Eagles have a history of beating undefeated Notre Dame teams. They did it in 1993, when the Irish were 10-0, and again in 2002, when the Irish were 8-0.

Notre Dame needed triple overtime last Saturday to beat Pittsburgh (4-5), which was a 17-point underdog.

Kelly believes the Irish learned their lesson, saying that in coming back from a 20-6 deficit they showed they have the heart of a champion. Now it's time to show they have the head of a champion, he said.

"The head of a champion understands that each and every week you're going to get the opposition's very best," he said.

To play for a championship, the Irish are going to need some help. The Irish sit fourth in the BCS standings, behind Alabama, Kansas State and Oregon, and likely won't finish in the top two without some upsets.

Notre Dame supporters will argue that the Irish should be in the title game because they beat four ranked teams -- then-No. 10 Michigan State, then-No. 18 Michigan, then-No. 17 Stanford and then-No. 8 Oklahoma -- and have the nation's 10th-best total defense and second-ranked scoring defense.

Critics would say only Oklahoma and Stanford remain ranked. They also would point out that the Irish have struggled at home, winning five games by a combined 23 points and needing overtime in two, and that they rank 61st in total offense.

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