LIU Post senior attackman Matty Beccaris of North Babylon broke a 51-year-old school record last Saturday when he scored four goals in an 18-3 win over the University of the District of Columbia.

He finished the game with 146 career goals, surpassing Tom Postel’s total of 144. It became an exciting occasion for the Beccaris family and Postel, a former coach at Post who was pleased to yield his mark to the son of a good friend, Arthur Beccaris.

“I’m happy,’’ Postel, 72, said. “I watched this kid for the last four years. He’s a nice player, a good shooter. He’s got a lot of awareness. And his father also has done a lot for the game.’’

Arthur Beccaris, who has coached the sport on the high school level and is now working with special needs players, graduated from [the now defunct] Levittown Memorial and later played club lacrosse with Postel after a four-year career at Fairleigh Dickinson, where he totaled 209 points.

“Tommy was an idol to me when I was in 8th grade,’’ the elder Beccaris said. “I would hitchhike up to Hofstra to watch [the Long Island club] play,’’ in club lacrosse. “The year that I got out of college I tried out for Long Island and made the team. I’m in the locker room at Hofstra. Tommy comes up and says ‘hey kid, move your bags. That’s my locker.’”

The two became friends. Another longtime family friend, Post senior Ryan Slane, also from North Babylon, assisted on Matty’s record setting goal.

Beccaris can add to his record when Post (10-3) hosts Mercy (9-5) Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the semifinal round of the East Coast Conference Tournament. “Matty came in a freshman, started right away had an immediate impact on the in team,’’ Post coach John Jez said. “He was an All-American as a freshman and steadily progressed from there.’’

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Matty Beccaris has long been enamored of Postel, one of the top players in the nation in his time. “He’s definitely a legend that’s for sure,” Beccaris said. “Just to be mentioned with him is an achievement. I’m just fortunate enough to have been able to play these four years, not gotten hurt and be mentioned next to an all-time great like him.’’

Because freshmen were not eligible for the varsity until the late 1960s, Postel, a 1965 graduate, compiled his record over three years and 39 games. Beccaris is a four-year starter with 61 games in his career.

Neither Postel nor Matty Beccaris have an issue with the record being achieved in more games. “When it comes down to games and the amount of them, it’s not that I feel like I didn’t break it, however many games it took me,” Beccaris said. “If anyone (after) me in the Post family can do it I’d be cheering them on.’’

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