A tough day for Corey Webster

Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith, left, completes

Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith, left, completes a 43-yard pass as he is pressured by Corey Webster in the first half. (Dec. 23, 2012) (Credit: AP)

BALTIMORE -- The injury report listed Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith as questionable, but it was the play of Corey Webster, the Giant assigned to defend him, that deserved the designation Sunday.

Smith, who suffered a concussion last week against Denver, beat Webster on each of the Ravens' first two drives to help Baltimore build a two-touchdown lead in what became a 33-14 victory.

Joe Flacco targeted Smith -- who finished with five catches for 88 yards and a touchdown -- 11 times, four more than any other receiver.

"It seems like they were targeting and targeting [Webster]," safety Antrel Rolle said. "He made some plays and some plays he wasn't able to make. You are going to have games like that, but you have to fight and continue to fight and we have to win that fight and win that battle."

Smith grabbed a 6-yard touchdown pass to open the scoring and set up Baltimore's second score by taking a 43-yard pass to the 1-yard line. Two plays later, Flacco scored on a 1-yard run to make it 14-0.

"[Webster] would probably be the first one to tell you that he wishes he was better," coach Tom Coughlin said.

Webster had a hand in two key third-quarter third-down conversions for the Ravens. First, on third-and-7 from the Baltimore 29, Webster was called for a 17-yard pass-interference penalty on Smith. Then, on third-and-19 from the Giants' 48, Flacco connected with Dennis Pitta, who was covered by Webster and Stevie Brown, for 36 yards.

Rolle said he tried to pick up his teammate during the game.

"It's the same thing I tell myself or tell anybody else," Rolle said. "FIDO it. 'Forget it and drive on.' Corey is a great player. Corey has always been a great player."

Jason Pierre-Paul said the secondary's struggles were a result of the defensive front's inability to stop the run.

"There was definitely fire," Pierre-Paul said. "But they threw water on it. They just pounded and pounded and we couldn't stop the run. And in order for us to get the pass rush going, we gotta stop the run first. They've got a good scheme. I couldn't tell if it was play action or not. They executed so well."

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