Attorneys for Eli Manning are trying to convince a judge that the dealers suing the Giants quarterback tried to pressure him to settle a memorabilia lawsuit by releasing select notes that weren’t related to the disputed goods.

Emails released by the court on Wednesday were part of a motion seeking sanctions and legal fees against one of the plaintiffs’ attorneys after he released an email from Manning in 2010 that seemed to indicate he provided fake memorabilia rather than authentic game-used goods.

Manning angrily denied those allegations last week.

The lawsuit revolves around two pieces of equipment: a backup Super Bowl helmet from 2012 and another from the 2007-2008 season.

The memorabilia dealers suing Manning released a note sent by Manning to team equipment manager Joe Skiba, asking for two helmets that “can pass as game used.”

Manning’s lawyers say that email is taken out of context and all of Manning’s communications in context show he never provided inauthentic memorabilia.

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An attorney for sports memorabilia collector Eric Inselberg on Wednesday insisted his client received a fake Manning backup helmet for the 2012 Super Bowl.

Inselberg sued Manning, Giants co-owner John Mara, memorabilia company Steiner Sports and others in 2014, alleging they engaged in a scam to sell fake game-worn equipment. He also asked that the Giants be held responsible for the alleged lies that led to his indictment on federal changes that ruined his business.

The lawsuit is scheduled to go to trial in September.