FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- Tom Brady has tortured the Jets -- and just about every other NFL team -- since 2001. And if the Patriots quarterback has his way, he'll continue doing that for the next decade.

When asked how many more years he wants to play, the 38-year-old Brady said, "I want to play for a long time, maybe 10 more."

If Brady makes it that far, he'd be a modern-day George Blanda. The former Raiders quarterback didn't retire until he was 48.

"It's not always up to me," Brady said Wednesday about the chance to play another decade. "That's what my goals are. That's just what I'm hoping. It will take a lot to achieve that. Obviously, a team has to want you, but I love playing this sport. I love making the commitment to my teammates and my coaches. Hopefully I can do it for a long time."

Brady is already at an age that often signals the decline for many quarterbacks. Hall of Fame passers Joe Montana, Steve Young and Dan Marino retired at 38. So did Giants Super Bowl-winning quarterback Phil Simms. And Peyton Manning, now 39, is having one of his worst statistical years.

Brady is off to a rousing start with 14 touchdown passes and only one interception in leading the defending Super Bowl champions to a 5-0 start. And the interception came off a deflected pass in Sunday night's win over the Colts, when the ball went off receiver Julian Edelman's hands and was picked off by Colts safety Mike Adams.

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When asked if he gave Edelman any grief about the play, Brady quipped, "I haven't spoken to him all week."

(He was kidding.)

"He's a former quarterback, so those things happen," Brady said of Edelman. "He's made so many great catches and runs after catches. He's been a phenomenal player. I love Jules. He came in as a quarterback, and he's really built himself into what he is. He's a guy that's a huge playmaker for us, and we'll need him to make a bunch of plays on Sunday."

Brady was suspended four games in May for his alleged participation in a scheme to use purposely deflated footballs in the AFC Championship Game against the Colts on Jan. 18. A federal judge overturned that ruling the week before the Patriots' season began, and Brady has played some of the best football of his career so far.

Asked if Brady's offseason, which was marked by court appearances as well as his appeal to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, made him even more motivated to succeed this year, the Patriots quarterback said he's always eager to play well, regardless of the circumstances.

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"I've always tried to approach it the same way my entire career," Brady said. "I try to empty my bucket every week. I owe that to my teammates, our coaches, who put a lot of faith in me. I try to work as hard as I can. Football's a big commitment. It takes a lot physically and mentally to prepare yourself. I try to give it the best I can every day. There's a lot of responsibility on me. I never want to be part of the reason why we lose a game."