Here's an archive of Today's Tips and Sunday Tips for 2010:

Warm up like the pros. A human tendon, like a rubber band, is considerably less supple at 45 degrees than at 80 degrees. Beginning your spring practice session with a driver is asking to snap the rubber band. Mimic the professionals to avoid unnecessary injuries.

 Start with some light stretching--shoulders, hips, hamstrings. Hit your first 20 shots with a sand wedge, start with 40 percent effort and build slowly—really slowly—to 100 percent. Work through your bag incrementally, from sand wedge to 9-iron, 6-iron, hybrid, driver. Your body and your score will appreciate the difference.

                  --Charlie Bolling, PGA Head Professional, Fresh Meadow Country Club

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             Are you righthanded? Are you playing golf righthanded? If the answer is yes,then try to use the right hand a little more in the swing. You will notice that if

you swing a club with just your right hand that it is impossible to jerk the

club. It always swings smoothly. Great players like Tom Watson use their right hand in both the waggle and the swing. The right hand and arm will help get your club back a little farther. You may have heard otherwise but take it from me, you will be pleasantly surprised at the results for distance and control.

            --Bob DeStefano, PGA Head Professional,

              Gardiners Bay Country Club

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Putting Made Easy: As golfers, we are all searching for a repeating pendulum putting stroke. If you look at all the great putters from Bobby Jones to Ben Crenshaw to Loren Roberts to Tiger Woods, they all have two things in common: 

            First, their heads never move during the stroke until the ball is well on its way. Second, their hips,  knees and feet are kept perfectly still, back and thru the stroke.  These factors hold true whether you are a belly putter, use a long putter or have a normal length putter. Try them and putting will come much more easily.

                  --Billy Smith, PGA Life Member, Pine Hollow Country Club

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“I watch many golfers try to hit the ball off their right side.  They either get their weight back and never get it forward, or get it forward and work backwards on the downswing.  A good drill to do doesn’t involve hitting a ball.  Start with your normal setup. While making a backswing, move your left foot together with your right. During the downswing step back to the left and bring your right foot together with your left.  This will get you to feel the proper weight shift.”

--Patrick McCarthy, PGA Assistant Professional, Garden City Golf Club

 

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“Here’s a quick way to check your pitching prowess: notice your finish.  When you take a half-swing or pitch shot, check that your lead arm (left arm for a right handed player) is extended and in a straight line at the finish.  Just as important, check to see that the shaft is in the same straight line as your arm.  Many times, amateurs allow the shaft to swing up, indicating a breakdown in their left wrist.  Keep the shaft in a line with your lead arm and you will hit more solid pitch shots.”

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--Michael Shank, PGA Head Professional, North Shore Country Club

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“If you are able to sneak in only a little time each week for practice, work on your distances. Know what a 40-yard shot is, and a 20-yard shot and a 60-yard shot and so on. Try to perfect your feel for distance control. Not every golfer can hit the ball as far as John Daly does or as straight as Kenny Perry does. But any golfer can hit the ball 40 yards. Learn how to use that wedge and practice for specific distances.”

--Mike Acerra, PGA Head Professional, Plandome Country Club

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            “Hit solid fairway wood shots the next time out. Here is how: 1) Always check your lie first. Make sure that the ball is sitting up just a little bit, enough to hit the shot.  Think twice about hitting your fairway wood from an uneven lie, if not hit perfectly the miss will be exaggerated. 2) Have a good setup. Play the ball inside the heel of your front foot  so the club can get to square at impact. 3) Make a controlled swing. Eighty percent is enough.  Swing in control and in balance to hit straight shots.”

             --Greg Pace, PGA Assistant Professional, Huntington Country Club

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            The grip can dictate the swing path and clubface angle.  The grip is not an absolute, it can have many different looks. But a good grip MUST be in the fingers.  This will give the player the most leverage, power, control and club head speed.  A grip that is too strong will produce hooks and a grip that is too weak will cause slices.  Before you try to change your swing, change your grip first.  To get used to gripping in the fingers, practice driving your golf cart with the steering wheel in your fingers by gently pulling the wheel towards you while placing the pads of your hand on the wheel.  Do not push your hands down on the wheel. Transfer that feeling to your club.”

            --Jeff Cowell, PGA Head Professional, The Woodmere Club

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“Every golfer’s dream is to hit drives far and straight. Here is how to start doing that: One of the most important fundamentals needed to strike your driver well is a full shoulder turn on the backswing.  Many people talk about finishing the swing. But if you turn and complete your shoulder turn in the backswing, the finish will take care of itself.  So turn your left shoulder (right shoulder if you’re a lefthanded golfer) until it runs into your chin on the way back. Then just watch those drives fly high and straight.”

             --Scott Hawkins, PGA Head Professional, Glen Head Country Club

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“If we actually looked at PGA Tour statistics, we would realize that the best golfers, playing on the best greens, miss that six-foot putt 21 percent of the time. The issue that I have is our mental approach after we miss that six-footer.  Was it your stroke? Was it the green? As teachers, we have found that most of those putts are missed due to a deceleration of the putter. Try to implement this practice: Facing a four-foot putt, preferably slightly uphill, take a club and lay it sideways in front of the hole. Now practice putting to the hole with enough speed so that the ball will hit the shaft, pop over and fall in the hole. This should help that tentative stroke.”

            --John V. Hines, PGA Certified Instructor, Baiting Hollow Club

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“Instead of trying to hit longer drives by swinging out of your shoes, try focusing on smoothing out the transition between your backswing and downswing.  Start your downswing with a slight lateral hip move toward the target without unwinding your upper body.  Starting your lower body first encourages the proper downswing sequence and will help you attack the inside of the ball. That will translate into a consistently solid hit, the key to longer drives.”

          --Matthew Dobyns, PGA Assistant Professional,  Deepdale Golf Club

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“To more consistently bring your driving range swing to the golf course, your playing mindset should be target and tempo.  The most important question a golfer can ask during the pre-shot routine is `what is my target?’  Pick as specific as a target as possible and keep that image in your mind even as you address the ball.  Add a deep yoga-type breath or two to your pre-shot routine to help you relax and swing smoothly.  Tempo is the glue that helps bring the mechanics you work on during practice into fruition during the course of play.”

--R.J. Ziats, PGA Teaching Professional, The Muttontown Club

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“Focusing on the score you are going to shoot before the round is finished is an unnecessary distraction.  If you are thinking about the score you are going to shoot, odds are you are not going to shoot it.  Your responsibility is to enjoy yourself, not have anxiety over what might be the first time you break 80, 90 or even 100. Stay in the present because the only shot that you have any control over is the next one.   A good strategy is to establish a good pre-shot routine.  The routine can be anything as long as it does not unduly delay play.  The key is that it is the same all the time.  It will help you focus on the shot at hand and not on parring in for 79.  Good luck and remember you can hit only one shot at a time.”

--Bob Rittberger, PGA Head Professional, Garden City Golf Club