Chre Teitelbaum, Will Sands lead Friends Academy to win

Friends Academy goalie Chre Teitelbaum stays square to

Friends Academy goalie Chre Teitelbaum stays square to a shooter during the third period. (April 4, 2013) (Credit: James Escher)

He made 15 saves and kept his team in the game early with some masterful point-blank stops. But of course the first thing Chre Teitelbaum was asked about after Friends Academy's impressive 9-1 victory over host Port Washington Thursday was his assist.

"Sometimes they'll lock me off and sometimes they'll let me run. I wasn't expecting it," said Teitelbaum, a senior who had never scored a varsity point until late in the third quarter. He made a save and cautiously moved upfield, looking for a teammate to pass to in transition. Instead, he saw open turf.

"Once I crossed midfield, the guy who should've slid to me didn't, so I kept coming," Teitelbaum said. "One of our middies was open and I hit him with the pass."

The middie was sophomore Tyler Sehring, who took the pass in the high slot and had only the goalie in front of him. Sehring converted for a 7-0 lead and gave Teitelbaum the first assist of his career.

Of course, his coach, Brian Crocco, wanted to talk more about his goalie's work between the pipes rather than between the white lines. "Sometimes, he plays as well as his defense. Today he played much better than that," Crocco said. "He made some big early saves when we dodged a couple of bullets. That's as complete a game as a goalie can have."

Friends' top player, Bucknell-bound junior Will Sands, had about as complete a game as an attack can have. Sands, stationed behind the cage, fed Kellan Sehring and Struan Coleman for goals three minutes apart in the first quarter. Then Sands had a natural hat trick in the second quarter, scoring unassisted on a dodge from behind the cage at 7:52, converting a high blast in the slot on a feed from Johnny Nierenberg at 6:40 and ringing one off the far post on a man-up opportunity off a pass from Tyler Tam.

"Props to my teammates for getting open and finishing and props to my teammates for finding me," Sands said. "I think of myself as more of a playmaker, but if they overplay me, I'll beat them."

Crocco called Sands "a very intelligent player. His feet allow his hands to do whatever he wants. He's a very quick kid."

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