It hasn't taken long for Scott Cebollero to use the skills he's learned from his brother to continue the strong soccer tradition of his family at Commack High School.

Scott, who was a defender and role player on last year's Class AA state championship team, has taken over the captain role from his brother Justin, last year's Suffolk player of the year and current member of the LIU Post team. And Scott's off to a strong start this season, posting five goals and two assists in six games.

"I learned that you don't let the pressure get to you," the soft-spoken Scott said about last season. "It's just another game that you got to get through and whatever the outcome is, it's the outcome."

Scott said he learned how to become a better leader from playing with his brother on varsity. Because of the two-year age difference, Scott and Justin played on different club teams growing up. They would often do 1-on-1 drills together and when Justin comes home from LIU Post, the brothers train together. Many of Scott's skills have come from training with Justin, and you wouldn't be wrong to say it's been mutually beneficial.

"I think having Justin on the team last year really gave Scott the confidence he needed to get where he is this year," Commack coach Dave Moran. "Scott looks a lot more comfortable this year just taking over the team."

Their connection from training together was on display in outstanding fashion for Commack on Sept. 18, 2014 when Scott set up his Justin for the game-winning goal against Sachem North in overtime. Justin called the play "a nice little brother combination."

advertisement | advertise on newsday

That play was last season when Scott was a sophomore learning to compete and maintain a position on a varsity field. A lot has changed in a year for Scott, but not so much for Sachem North.

Fast forward to the Commack-Sachem North game on Sept. 10. Scott scored the game-winning goal in the game's final minute.

Moran couldn't help but tease Sachem coach Chris Russo following the game. Moran also reminded Russo about another Cebollero working his way up to varsity -- Joe, who's in eighth grade.

"It was incredible and then having him set me up, it's a younger brother setting up an older brother to achieve victory and when I scored that, it was intense," Justin remembers from his 2014 goal. "It was so much fun and with the whole team dog-piling me and with him tackling me down showed the love we have for each other is amazing and that the sport impacts us a lot."

The personality differences are evident. Justin, much more talkative, was a vocal leader for Commack. Scott is more comfortable letting his play do his talking and good luck trying to get him to brag about himself.

"Just keep on working hard and keep pushing through the season," Scott says. "There's a long season to go."

Even though Scott's only a junior, he has the maturity and experience that mimics more of a junior in college. He started -- and won -- a state championship game as a sophomore and he's trained with an elite Long Island player his whole life, his brother.

That confidence was on display when Commack lost 3-2 to Brentwood on Monday, the top-ranked team in Class AA entering the season. Scott had a goal and assist in the game.

"All the good teams, they know about Scott Cebollero," Moran said. "So last year he came in as a sophomore, maybe flew in under the radar with some teams, this year, he's on every team's radar."