Could it be time for Rangers president and general manager Glen Sather to relinquish the latter title? Maybe.

The Rangers on Friday did not deny a New York Post story in which Sather, 71, indicated that he is undecided about remaining in the dual roles, which he has held since 2000.

Sather's tenure has been widely debated since he had surgery for prostate cancer in March 2013, which Newsday first reported.

Sather kept both roles after the surgery, but Jeff Gorton, a former assistant general manager of the Bruins who has been Sather's right-hand man for four years, has long been considered the likely successor as general manager.

Neither Sather, who as a coach led the Edmonton Oilers to five Stanley Cups, nor Gorton could be reached for comment. A team spokesman said in a text message: "Nothing further to add."

If Sather, who often accompanies the team on road trips, were to retain his job as president but step down as general manager, he would maintain considerable input but be less involved in day-to-day operations.

Gorton, 45, who already oversees hockey operations for the Rangers, served as Bruins interim general manager for more than three months in 2006.

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Gorton has been on the list of candidates for general manager openings in Boston and Toronto this spring. Sather did not permit him to be interviewed for the Bruins' opening, which was filled by Don Sweeney.

During his tenure in Boston, Gorton acquired goaltender Tuukka Rask in a trade for Andrew Raycroft, landed Phil Kessel, Milan Lucic and Brad Marchand in the 2006 draft and acquired free agent Zdeno Chara.

With his trades of prospects and free-agent signings, Sather helped shape the Rangers into a club that has been in the NHL's final four in three of the past four seasons. He also chose Alain Vigneault over Mark Messier as coach two years ago.

Notes & quotes: Rangers defensemen Dan Girardi and Marc Staal underwent ankle surgery Thursday in New York and are expected to be fully recovered before training camp. Girardi, who played 82 regular-season games and the playoffs, had a bursa excision. Staal, who played 80 games and the playoffs, had a bone chip removed, the team said.