It’s not a lot to hang their hat on, but the Rangers have been behind entering the third period in each of their last three home games and have earned at least one point in each, going 2-0-1. That hasn’t happened since Nov. 10-17 in 2008, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

In one small sample, the Rangers have proved that they can be resilient when it counts, at least in the Garden. “It’s that time of the year where you need to find ways to get points,” Keith Yandle said. “You find a way to get it to overtime and you never know what can happen.”

advertisement | advertise on newsday

As it turned out, it was the first career overtime goal for J.T. Miller, who had a team-high eight shots in the 49-shot barrage, and the first goal during a 3-on-3, which was instituted this season for overtime, since Dec. 10, 2005, when Martin Rucinsky scored the game-winner in overtime at St. Louis.

Miller tests patience

Ryan McDonagh admitted that the Rangers were frustrated by goaltender Ryan Miller. “I think anyone is naturally a little bit frustrated,” McDonagh said. “It was a test of our patience, Sometimes when you get those opportunities and not finding a way you forget about the system and try to do something different to force the issue. But we didn’t give away a lot of pucks in the offensive. We made high-percentage plays. For the majority of the night, we were on the same page, so that was good to see.”

Blue notes

The Rangers had 76 shot attempts, including the 49 on goal and the rest blocks or misses. The Canucks had 40 . . . Rick Nash had seven shots on goal and Viktor Stalberg six. Only three Rangers: Yandle, Jayson Megna, who was in the lineup because Derick Brassard had the flu, and Jesper Fast, didn’t have a shot on goal. Fast did hit the post on a deflection in the second period.