Ducks watch: Bobby Blevins

Long Island Ducks #26 Bobby Blevins, P

Long Island Ducks #26 Bobby Blevins, P (Credit: Handout)

Bobby Blevins was traded to the Ducks by the Rockland Boulders of the Canadian-American League last week. He was the ace of the Rockland staff in its two years of existence. He earned the first win in franchise history. In two starts with the Ducks, Blevins has pitched 111/3 innings and allowed 11 hits and three walks with 10 strikeouts. He has a 3.18 ERA in two no-decisions. Blevins was 8-9 with a 3.65 ERA in 20 starts with Rockland with 86 strikeouts and 30 walks in 1352/3 innings. The 27-year-old righthander was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 13th round of the 2007 amateur draft. He got as high as Triple-A in 2010. Blevins is from upstate Briarcliff Manor and attended Le Moyne College.

 

What was your reaction when you found out you were traded to the Ducks?

It's a new opportunity to help be a part of a championship team. I want to help them win. That's why I was brought in. I have a job to do and every fifth day I am going to go out there and compete and give them a chance to win. Hopefully, at the end I get the ring. It's a good opportunity to get new eyes on you and face better competition.

 

What is the difference in the leagues?

The competition is much better in the Atlantic League. The ballparks are really nice. It's almost like playing in the big leagues. A lot of people in this league have been in the big leagues or been to a major-league camp or been at Triple-A.

 

What was Triple-A with the Dodgers like?

It was a great experience. I got to be around some Hall-of-Famers. I met Sandy Koufax and Joe Torre. I got an opportunity a lot of people wished and dreamed they could have. I got a chance to face great competition.

 

Who is the toughest hitter you faced in Triple-A?

Bryan LaHair [now with the Chicago Cubs).

 

LaHair is 29 and got his first opportunity to play full time this season and made the National League All-Star team. How much does that encourage you?

It absolutely does. I've played against some guys in the independent leagues that have been in the majors. It's all about getting that opportunity and what you do with it. That's why I'm still playing baseball. I am trying to keep the dream alive. I'm just trying to get better and better each time I go out there. You can never stop learning.

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