Hope Solo won't be disciplined for Chastain tweets

Hope Solo of the USA in action during Hope Solo of the USA in action during the women's soccer first round Group G match against Colombia on Day 1 of the London 2012 Olympic Games. (July 29, 2012) Photo Credit: Getty Images

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MANCHESTER, England -- Hope Solo met with the coach and captains of the U.S. women's soccer team Sunday to discuss her latest outburst of candor, a Twitter rant that did no good for the image of the squad and distracted from preparations for the upcoming game against North Korea in the Olympic tournament.

Coach Pia Sundhage said Solo will not be disciplined for the series of tweets that criticized former U.S. player Brandi Chastain's commentary during the NBC broadcast of the Americans' 3-0 win over Colombia on Saturday.

"We had a conversation: If you look at the women's national team, what do you want [people] to see? What do you want them to hear?" Sundhage told reporters at the team hotel. "And that's where we do have a choice -- as players, coaches, staff, the way we respond to certain things."

Solo rattled off four tweets following Saturday's game, upset over Chastain's criticisms of the team's defensive play.

"Its 2 bad we cant have commentators who better represents the team&knows more about the game," tweeted Solo. She also told Chastain to "lay off commentating about defending" and goalkeeping "until you get more educated" and "the game has changed from a decade ago." Those are hardly the type of positive comments the naturally upbeat Sundhage likes to hear.

The meeting with Solo took place after the team arrived in Manchester, where the Americans (2-0) will play the North Koreans on Tuesday in a game that will determine pairings for the quarterfinals. Co-captain Abby Wambach said the meeting lasted about five minutes.

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Chastain, one of the most accomplished players in U.S. team history, refused to be drawn into the fray.

"I'm here to do my job, which is to be an honest and objective journalist at the Olympics, nothing more than that," said Chastain, who earned 192 caps from 1988-2004 and is best known for scoring the deciding penalty kick in the World Cup final in 1999.

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