U.S. Open Day 11: Aces and faults

Radek Stepanek of Czech Republic and Leander Paes

Radek Stepanek of Czech Republic and Leander Paes of India celebrate match point during their men's doubles semi-final match against Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan of the United States of America on Day Eleven of the 2013 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. (Sept. 5, 2013) (Credit: Getty Images)

ACE. Squeaking sneakers during play. Audible evidence of a tennis player's need for good footwork.

ACE. The face-to-face sideways shuffle that doubles partner Leander Paes and Radek Stepanek performed after scoring big points. It's more creative than the Bryan twins' chest bumps.

ACE. The classic old one-handed backhand. Ye Olde Tennis Shot has helped produce two quarterfinal upsets in men's play, Richard Gasquet over David Ferrer and Stanislas Wawrinka over Andy Murray.



U.S. Open: Men's results | Women's results



FAULT. Really loud "Fault!'' calls by linespeople admirably doing their jobs are informative. But it seems to add insult to injury to the player who has just botched a shot.

By the numbers

20-1 Rafael Nadal's hardcourt match won-lost record in 2013.

38-1 Victoria Azarenka's hardcourt match won-lost record since she lost to Serena Williams in last year's Open final.

1.000 Andy Murray's winning percentage in night matches at the Open. (Equaled only by Pete Sampras.) But he played -- and lost -- in the sunshine Thursday.

Furthermore

The tennis players' sign language: A nod is calling for a ball from the ballpersons. A hand wiping in front of the face is calling for a towel. A raised finger, or raised racket, toward the chair umpire is calling for a challenge review.

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