U.S. Open Day 3 aces and faults

Roger Federer and basketball Hall of Famer Michael

Roger Federer and basketball Hall of Famer Michael Jordan meet following a match on Day 2 of the 2014 U.S. Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Aug. 26, 2014. (Credit: Getty Images / Chris Trotman)

ACE. After Michael Jordan sat in Roger Federer's box Tuesday night, Federer spoke of enjoying pickup basketball games. And evaluated his own jump shot. "Not great," he said. "It's OK. Looks good, but the results are not the best."

FAULT. Outside the new practice-court viewing area, where practice times are listed for players, there also is a redundant display for "current time." For anyone who asks what time it is. Right now.

ACE. Victoria Azarenka offered inside information on how she deals with difficult moments in a match: "I talk to myself. I curse at myself. I pump myself up. I don't really give a damn how it looks . . . whatever helps me to fight and give my best."



U.S. Open: Men's results | Women's results



BY THE NUMBERS

9 Years since the U.S. Open became the first Slam event to use replay technology and player challenges.

29.9% Of almost 5,000 challenges won by players since then.

49 Aces in one match, still the U.S. Open record, by Dutch player Richard Krajicek in his 1999 quarterfinal loss to Yevgeny Kafelnikov. Krajicek's only career major title was 1996 Wimbledon.

FURTHERMORE . . . Good news for 15-year-old wild card CiCi Bellis, who shocked 13th seed Dominika Cibulkova of Slovenia on Tuesday: A wild card once won the U.S. Open women's title. But that was Kim Clijsters (Bellis' childhood idol) in 2009, when Clijsters, the 2005 champ, returned to the tour following a two-year absence after having her first child.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Tennis videos

Newsday on social media

@Newsday

advertisement | advertise on newsday