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US player Serena Williams celebrates her women's singles (Credit: Getty Images)

US player Serena Williams celebrates her women's singles quarter-final victory over Czech Republic's Petra Kvitova on day eight of the 2012 Wimbledon Championships tennis tournament at the All England Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London. (July 3, 2012)

Wimbledon women's champions since 1968

A look at each winner of the Wimbledon women's singles title since the open era began in 1968.

BILLIE JEAN KING – 1968, '72-73, '75 United
(Credit: AP)

BILLIE JEAN KING – 1968, '72-73, '75
United States

King's first two Wimbledon titles came prior to the Open era, in 1966-67. In 1972, King also won the French Open and U.S. Open; she may have won the single-season Grand Slam, but opted not to play in the Australian Open.

ANN HAYDON JONES – 1969 Great Britain Haydon-Jones
(Credit: AP)

ANN HAYDON JONES – 1969
Great Britain

Haydon-Jones was ranked in the world top 10 from 1957 through 1963, then from 1965 through 1970. The highest she made it was No. 2, which she reached in 1967, and in 1969 when she won Wimbledon.

MARGARET COURT – 1970 Australia After retiring form
(Credit: AP)

MARGARET COURT – 1970
Australia

After retiring form tennis in 1966, Court returned in 1968, and was more dominant than ever. Court won three of four Grand Slam titles in 1969 -- only falling short at Wimbledon -- then swept the four Grand Slam titles in 1970.

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EVONNE GOOLAGONG CAWLEY – 1971, '80 Australia Goolagong
(Credit: AP)

EVONNE GOOLAGONG CAWLEY – 1971, '80
Australia

Goolagong won seven Grand Slam singles titles in her career. In 1971, she took home both the U.S. Open and Wimbledon championships, the only year in her career when she won more than one Grand Slam singles event. After getting shut out of Grand Slam titles for three seasons, Goolagong won Wimbledon in 1980.

CHRIS EVERT – 1974, '76, '81 United States
(Credit: AP)

CHRIS EVERT – 1974, '76, '81
United States

The most dominant women's tennis player of the late 1970s, Evert won 18 career Grand Slam singles titles. In 1975, she won both the singles and doubles titles at Wimbledon.

VIRGINIA WADE - 1977 Great Britain Wade won
(Credit: AP)

VIRGINIA WADE - 1977
Great Britain

Wade won Wimbledon at 32 years old in 1977. It was her third of three career Grand Slam singles titles, her other wins coming at the U.S. Open in 1968 and in Australia in 1972. Wade beat Chris Evert, the defending Wimbledon champion, in the 1977 semis.

MARTINA NAVRATILOVA – 1978-79, '82-87, '90 United States
(Credit: AP)

MARTINA NAVRATILOVA – 1978-79, '82-87, '90
United States

No player in any sport dominated an event like Navratilova dominated Wimbledon. The 18-time Grand Slam singles champion -- not to mention 31-time Grand Slam doubles champion -- won nine Wimbledon titles in a 13-year period.

STEFFI GRAF – 1988-89, '91-93, '95-96 Germany As
(Credit: AP)

STEFFI GRAF – 1988-89, '91-93, '95-96
Germany

As Navratilova's career began to wind down, Graf emerged as the dominant women's tennis player. Graf won all four Grand Slam singles tournaments in 1988, then took home the gold medal at the 1988 Seoul Olympics; the five wins were later called the "Golden Slam."

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CONCHITA MARTINEZ – 1994 Spain Martínez, who topped
(Credit: AP)

CONCHITA MARTINEZ – 1994
Spain

Martínez, who topped Martin Navratilova in three sets in 1994, was the first Spanish woman to win the singles title at Wimbleon. Martinez made two other Grand Slam singles finals in her career; runner-up finishes in the Australian Open in 1998 and French Open in 2000.

MARTINA HINGIS – 1997 Switzerland Hingis' 1997 was
(Credit: AP)

MARTINA HINGIS – 1997
Switzerland

Hingis' 1997 was one of the most remarkable seasons of any women's tennis player in history. At just 17 years old, she won the Australian Open, Wimbledon championship and U.S. Open. She won just two more Grand Slam singles titles; Australian Opens in 1998 and '99.

JANA NOVOTNA – 1998? Czech Republic More than
(Credit: AP)

JANA NOVOTNA – 1998
? Czech Republic

More than a decade after turning pro, Novotna managed her first -- and only -- Grand Slam singles title, a win at Wimbledon in 1998. She took down Nathalia Tauziat in straight sets in the final.

LINDSAY DAVENPORT – 1999 United States Davenport's win
(Credit: AP)

LINDSAY DAVENPORT – 1999
United States< />
Davenport's win in 1999 kicked off a five-year run for American women at Wimbledon. It was Davenport third of three Grand Slam singles titles, following wins in the 1996 French Open and 1997 U.S. Open. Davenport was also a six-time Grand Slam singles runner-up -- each instance occurring at the Australian Open.

VENUS WILLIAMS – 2000-01, '05, '07-08 United States
(Credit: AP)

VENUS WILLIAMS – 2000-01, '05, '07-08
United States

In addition to her five singles titles at Wimbledon, Williams also won four doubles titles at the All England Club. She made it through a gauntlet of opponents to win her first title in 2000, taking down Martina Hingis, Serena Williams and defending champion Lindsay Davenport in consecutive matches.

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SERENA WILLIAMS – 2002-03, '09-10, '12 United States
(Credit: AP)

SERENA WILLIAMS – 2002-03, '09-10, '12
United States

Twice, Venus Williams won back-to-back Wimbledon titles: in 2000-01, and in 2007-08. Twice, younger sister Serena won back-to-back Wimbledon titles: in 2002-03, and in 2009-10. She then won her fifth, tying her with sister Venus for fourth-most titles in the Open era, in 2012. The sisters' dominated the 2000s, winning nine of 11 possible Wimbledon titles from 2000-2010.

MARIA SHARAPOVA – 2004 Russia At 17 years
(Credit: AP)

MARIA SHARAPOVA – 2004
Russia

At 17 years old, Sharapova shocked two-time champion Serena Williams in the 2004 Wimbledon final. Sharapova snapped a four-year Williams run and five-year American run at Wimbledon with her upset win.

AMELIE MAURESMO – 2006 France Mauresmo won her
(Credit: AP)

AMELIE MAURESMO – 2006
France

Mauresmo won her lone Wimbledon title during her most dominant year on the women's tour; she also won the Australian Open, and made it to the semifinals of the U.S. Open.

PETRA KVITOVA – 2011 Czech Republic Kvitová's run
(Credit: AP)

PETRA KVITOVA – 2011
Czech Republic

Kvitová's run in 2011 was serendipitous; she managed to avoid all of the top three seeds in the field, and other than No. 4 seed Victoria Azarenka (semifinals) and No. 5 seed Maria Sharapova (finals), the eighth-seeded Kvitova didn't play anyone ranked in the top 15 in the field.

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