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An undated photo shows the bow of the (Credit: AP)

An undated photo shows the bow of the TITANIC at rest on the bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. The first tourists to see the bow up close viewed it from the portholes of a tiny submersible in early September 1998.

Titanic historic photos

Historic photos of the Titanic in 1912.

An undated photo shows the bow of the
(Credit: AP)

An undated photo shows the bow of the TITANIC at rest on the bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. The first tourists to see the bow up close viewed it from the portholes of a tiny submersible in early September 1998.

Mrs. J.J.
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

Mrs. J.J. "Molly" Brown presenting trophy cup award to Capt. Arthur Henry Rostron, for his service in the rescue of the Titanic. (May 29, 1912)

From the S.S. CARPATHIA the iceberg that sank
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

From the S.S. CARPATHIA the iceberg that sank the TITANIC can be seen in this photo.(Apr. 1912)

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Louis and Michel Navratil, of Nice, France, sit
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

Louis and Michel Navratil, of Nice, France, sit on their mother's lap on board the S.S. Carpathian after being rescued from the Titanic.

Harold Bride, the surviving wireless operator of the
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

Harold Bride, the surviving wireless operator of the TITANIC, is carried up the ramp of a ship with his feet bandaged. (1912)

Crowds wait outside for news of the RMS
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

Crowds wait outside for news of the RMS TITANIC, which struck an iceberg in April 1912 and sank, killing more than 1,500 people.

Two lifeboats carrying survivors from the Titanic float
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

Two lifeboats carrying survivors from the Titanic float near the rescue ship Carpathia on the morning of April 15, 1912, hours after the disaster. The Titanic did not carry enough lifeboats to save all her passengers, and many of the available boats were launched carrying fewer than their 65-passenger capacity. (Apr. 15, 1912)

An emergency cutter lifeboat carrying a few survivors
(Credit: NARA/)

An emergency cutter lifeboat carrying a few survivors from the Titanic floats near the rescue ship Carpathia on the morning of April 15, 1912, just hours after the disaster. The Titanic did not carry enough lifeboats to save all her passengers, and many of the available boats were launched carrying fewer than their 65-passenger capacity. (Apr. 15, 1912)

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A radio telegram is on display at the
(Credit: AP Photo/)

A radio telegram is on display at the Titanic Historical Society's museum in Springfield, Mass., which was originally dispatched from the German ship the AMERIKA to the TITANIC to warn her crew of the ice bergs that they eventually rammed, but the telegram was never deciphered by the ship's telegram operator.

The luxury liner RMS TITANIC departs Southampton, England,
(Credit: AP Photo/)

The luxury liner RMS TITANIC departs Southampton, England, on her maiden Atlantic Ocean voyage to New York. Celebrating the ship and the people who built her is the aim of Titanic Belfast, a shiny new "visitor experience" whose four prow-like wings jut jauntily skyward beside the River Lagan on the site of the old Harland and Wolff shipyard. Titanic, then the world's largest, most luxurious ocean liner, left Belfast on April 2, 1912 8 days before its maiden voyage from England to New York. Twelve days later, it struck an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland and sank in the early hours of April 15. More than 1,500 of the 2,200 people on board died. (Apr. 9, 1912)

A group of shipbuilders gather under the screws
(Credit: Library of Congress/)

A group of shipbuilders gather under the screws of the propellers to give an idea of size of the RMS Titanic while it was under construction, before its launch on May 31, 1911, after which it began a series of sea trials for its fated maiden voyage on April 10, 1912.

In this 1912 file photo and provided by
(Credit: AP)

In this 1912 file photo and provided by the Frank O. Braynard Collection, the Titanic leaves on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England.

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