"Anti-sweat" suit promises to make subways more tolerable

(Photo by Andrew Hinderaker)

For the chic New York City man sweltering on the subway platform, there is now the “anti-sweat” suit.

A Manhattan tailor catering to city bigwigs has started peddling a $1,200 suit that promises to be 10 degrees cooler and deter subway “shvitz.” The custom-made Zegna suits is made with Australian wool, which is said to wick moisture and cool the skin.

“The market is businessmen and lawyers ... who still have to wear a suit in the subway,” said KJ Singh, a sales manager for Mohan’s Custom Tailors, which has sold a hundred of the suits since introducing them this year.

It’s no wonder business has been brisk. So far this month, temperatures have been above 90 degrees for 11 out of the last 19 days, according to AccuWeather meteorologists.

Temperatures have trended 4 degrees above normal all summer, and experts said that the worst is yet to come, with late July and August tending to be the most brutal.

“I think it’s fantastic,” said Scott Yarwood, 30, a Wall Street banker when told about the suit. “You get what you pay for.”

“With the weather these days, it would be worth it,” said Matt Saidman, 25, of Forest Hills.

So are the threads worth the hefty price tag?

“It’s not like I’m wearing an air conditioner,” said Christopher Sabatini, amNewYork’s design director, who tested the anti-sweat suit in the subways Monday. “But sweat is not rolling down my back.”

It took Sabatini 10 minutes to start sweating on the Penn Station platform; he said he would usually “be a flood” by then.

Tags: new york city , subways , suit

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