Three Manhattan buildings earn landmark status

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On Tuesday the city gave three Manhattan structures landmark status, highlighting spots in the East Village and the Lower East Side.

According to LPC Chairman Robert Tierney, the buildings tell stories of the immigrant life in New York’s past.

“These buildings collectively speak to many aspects of the immigrant experience in the East Village and on the Lower East Side in the 19th and early 20th centuries,” he said.

The Eleventh Street Methodist Episcopal Chapel on 11th Street between avenues A and B is a Gothic revival-style church that was completed in 1868. At two stories tall and all red bricks, it now houses the Father’s Heart Ministry Center.

The second building, Loew’s Canal Street Theatre at 31 Canal St., opened in 1927. The four-story Spanish Baroque-style structure was a theater until the ’50s, and it is now retail space.

And the third building, 97 Bowery Building between Hester and Grand streets, is one of the few cast-iron structures in the area. The 141-year-old building is now home to a cafe.

Since the LPC started in 1965, it’s given more than 27,000 buildings landmark status. To get that status, a building must be architecturally, historically or culturally significant. The status protects the buildings from unapproved changes.
 

Tags: City Living , landmark , east village , lower east side , architecture , historical

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