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TODAY'S PAPER

Tips for making Halloween trick-or-treating safer

Kidsday reporters Hussain Iqbal, left, David Bailey and Dylan Smakal advise checking Halloween candy to make sure it's safe. / Allison Krieb

In just a few weeks, the air gets a little colder, leaves are falling, and horror movies are playing. Be prepared because you are about to jump out of your skin. All the creepy costumes will send chills down your spine. Get ready because you and your friends will be running around the neighborhood ringing doorbells and having candy dumped into your Halloween baskets.

We do have some advice...

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In just a few weeks, the air gets a little colder, leaves are falling, and horror movies are playing. Be prepared because you are about to jump out of your skin. All the creepy costumes will send chills down your spine. Get ready because you and your friends will be running around the neighborhood ringing doorbells and having candy dumped into your Halloween baskets.

We do have some advice for you: Be careful! Make sure you look at your candy carefully and check that the wrappers are intact. If it looks as if your candy has been tampered with — holes in the bag or just loose candy — throw it away. Trick-or-treat only at houses where you know the people. Don’t take a chance and think it can’t happen to you. We think it is an even better idea if you have your parents check your goodies first.

Allison Krieb and Mike MacKenzie’s sixth-grade class, Longwood Middle School, Middle Island

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