TODAY'S PAPER

LI landscapes forever changed by superstorm Sandy

On Oct. 29, 2012, superstorm Sandy made landfall on Long Island, bringing with it record storm surges, pummeling winds and heavy rains. In the aftermath, 13 Long Islanders were killed, and thousands of homes and businesses were either destroyed or severely damaged. While much of the damage has been repaired in the nearly five years since, several areas on Long Island still show permanent signs of...

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On Oct. 29, 2012, superstorm Sandy made landfall on Long Island, bringing with it record storm surges, pummeling winds and heavy rains. In the aftermath, 13 Long Islanders were killed, and thousands of homes and businesses were either destroyed or severely damaged. While much of the damage has been repaired in the nearly five years since, several areas on Long Island still show permanent signs of change. Check out some then-and-now photos of Sandy's wrath and the aftermath.

Homes in Westhampton have flooded lawns from the high tide in Shinnecock Bay caused by Hurricane Sandy as seen in this Oct 30, 2012 photo.

An aerial view of homes in Westhampton Beach on October 9, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy flooded lawns from the high tide in Shinnecock Bay on October 29, 2012.

An aerial view of the Breezy Point section of Queens shows the devastation and destruction left by the fire caused by Superstorm Sandy on Oct. 31, 2012.

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An aerial view of the Breezy Point section of Queens on October 6, 2017, almost 5 years after fires caused by the storm surge of Superstorm Sandy ignited numerous electrical fires and burned more than 100 homes to the ground on October 29, 2012.

Members of the U.S. Geological Survey headed out to the breach at Old Inlet, just South of Bellport Harbor to measure the depth of water and the speed at which was moving on Nov. 13, 2013.

An aerial view of the breach at Old Inlet, just South of Bellport Harbor on October 10, 2017, which was created during Superstorm Sandy on October 29, 2012. The breach appears to be permanent, showing a shallow depth.

Partially treated sewage continues to pour into Reynolds Channel from the Bay Park Plant in this Nov. 20, 2012 photo.

An aerial view of Reynolds Channel, facing west, between Long Beach (right) and Island Park on October 6, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012.

Partially treated sewage continues to pour into Reynolds Channel from the Bay Park Plant on Nov. 20, 2012, nearly a month after superstorm Sandy struck the area. This view looks east, with Long Beach on the right.

An aerial view of Reynolds Channel, facing east, between Long Beach (right) and Island Park, taken on October 6, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012.

St. Francis de Sales in Belle Harbor as seen on Nov. 14, 2012. It served as the main relief hub for the distribution of food, water, and clothing in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.

An aerial view of St. Francis de Sales Roman Catholic Church in Belle Harbor, Queens on October 6, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012. New homes have replaced the 5 homes directly behind the church that burned to the ground.

Robert Moses State Park, looking west, as seen on Nov. 20, 2012. The traffic circle was undercut by the storm surge from Sandy.

An aerial view of Robert Moses State Park, looking west, on October 7, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012. The beaches now have several hundred additional feet of sand added since Sandy.

Work continues in Long Beach on the boardwalk as sand is loaded onto trucks and then placed along the beach, as seen in this Feb. 21, 2013 photo.

An aerial view facing east of the Long Beach shoreline and boardwalk taken on October 6, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012. A new 2.25 mile long boardwalk has been rebuilt and new fortified dunes and birms have been built up between the beach and the west-end neighborhoods of Long Beach.

An aerial view of the damage near Atlantic Street and Ocean Street in Lindenhurst after Superstorm Sandy on Nov. 2, 2012.

An aerial view of the canal between Ocean Street and Atlantic Street in Lindenhurst on October 7, 2017, almost 5 years after Superstorm Sandy pounded Long Island on October 29, 2012. Several homes that were heavily damaged have since been removed from their neighborhood.