TODAY'S PAPER
58° Good Evening
58° Good Evening
Business

Fewer banks imposing new obstacles to loans

WASHINGTON - Fewer banks are erecting new hurdles for people and businesses to get loans, a fresh sign credit problems are easing.

In a quarterly survey released yesterday, the Federal Reserve found that "commercial banks generally ceased tightening standards on many loan types" at the end of last year. The one exception: commercial real-estate loans.

Even though banks aren't imposing new restrictions on most loans, they aren't ready to ease the tough loan standards put in place during the financial crisis. Banks "have yet to unwind the considerable tightening that has occurred over the past two years," the Fed said.

Meanwhile, demand for home mortgages and other consumer loans weakened, a sign consumers are leery of making big-ticket purchases given double-digit unemployment and the fragile economic environment.

Consumers will help support economic growth, but they won't lead it by going on spending sprees. That's one main reason why the recovery this year is supposed to be modest rather than booming.

"The recent contraction in bank credit formation may owe more to weak demand than weak supply, a story which might not resonate politically but which nonetheless seems to be supported by the data," said Michael Feroli, economist at JPMorgan Chase.

Looking ahead, "significantly fewer" banks expected widespread deterioration in the value of the loans they hold this year, the Fed said. That's an improvement from the prior two years, the Fed said.

On the consumer end, some banks indicated that the credit quality of home equity loans and home mortgages held by prime borrowers would likely erode further in 2010.

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

More news