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Tech review: These apps once hit the top of the charts  

The Forks Over Knives app is a spinoff

The Forks Over Knives app is a spinoff of the "Forks Over Knives" diet documentary. Credit: Newsday/Forks Over Knives

Who's No. 1? These apps were. All spent time recently at the top of the charts in various categories on the iOS App Store or the Google Play Store. But despite their popularity, they may have gone unnoticed by many mobile device users.

Fork Over Knves

(iOS, Android; $4.99)

This recipe app recently hit No. 1 on the paid food apps in iOS. (Google has it classified under lifestyle apps, where it hit No. 2 over the summer.) The app is a spinoff of the “Forks Over Knives” documentary, which promotes a low-fat, plant-based diet. But the recipes look tasty for anyone’s palate, including hearty but heart-healthy dinners and some very rich-looking desserts.

Calm

(iOS, Android; free)

Currently the No.1 free health app on iOS (it’s the No. 3 free health Android app), this popular app is subtitled “Meditate, Sleep, Relax.” The app, an Apple app of the year in 2017, uses a wide range of techniques including stories and soothing music to help you relax and get a better night’s sleep. It may also be the perfect tonic for stressed-out LIRR commuters who can enjoy some calm as they speed to and from work. 

MyShake

(iOS, Android; free)

Sorry, this is not an app to get you your burgers and shakes at Shake Shack. MyShake was a sleepy app from the University of California Berkeley Seismology Lab when it suddenly skyrocketed to the top of both the iOS and Android free education charts this month. The reason: Recent reports of seismic activity on the West Coast made this earthquake notification app a must-have for Californians. While it’s not vital for Long Islanders, the app’s information is very interesting.

Epocrates

(iOS, Android; free)

Currently the No. 1 grossing medical app on the Apple Store, (it’s No. 2 on the Google Play Store), Epocrates is aimed at health care professionals and clinicians although the general public will find a lot of vital information. The app helps physicians make diagnostic decisions and includes a drug interaction checker and pill identifier. The app is free to download, but most features will require fairly hefty in-app purchases.

Internet’s “most dangerous” celeb

“Gilmore Girls” actress Alexis Bledel has been named most dangerous celebrity on the internet in 2019 by cybersecurity firm McAfee. The reason: Internet search results for celebrities with Bledel as a topic are the most likely to contain results that lead to websites with malware. The malicious sites are typically “pirate” websites that promise access to copyrighted videos for free.

— PETER KING

Sweet and sour

If you’re a parent, this might surprise you. If you’re a teen, probably not. A new study published in PLOS One found that teens who watch a lot of TV or spend an above-average amount of time on their smartphones consume more sugary beverages, energy drinks and caffeine. The teens with the most TV and smartphone use easily exceeded daily recommendations for sugar and caffeine intake.

— PETER KING

Adobe left customer data exposed

Adobe left the data of 7.5 million of its customers exposed on the internet, including information on users’ subscription status and payment status. Adobe said the data didn’t include passwords or financial information. In 2013, hackers stole user names and encrypted passwords for 38 million Adobe customers. Adobe is the market leader in publishing software with products that include Photoshop and Illustrator.

— BLOOMBERG NEWS

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