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Tech Bytes: Office-occupancy gains lag in NYC, on LI

More than 27% of office workers in 10

More than 27% of office workers in 10 major cities were back at their desks as of May 5. But the New York metropolitan area, which includes Long Island, is lagging behind. Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto/Prostock-Studio

Employees are slowly transitioning from remote work and returning to offices as more people are vaccinated against COVID-19 and infection rates decline.

Kastle Systems, which analyzes office occupancy with its Back to Work Barometer, said 27.1% of office workers in 10 major cities were back at their desks as of May 5, the highest share in more than a year. But the New York metropolitan area, which includes Long Island, is lagging: Its office occupancy rate was 16.3%, second-lowest of the 10 major cities, ahead of only San Francisco.

The Dallas metro area saw the highest occupancy rate, with 41.8% percent of workers in the office.

Pause that refreshes

For anyone who has regretted tweeting an insulting or obscenity-filled reply on Twitter, the social network wants to give you pause — literally. Twitter will prompt iOS and Android users asking them if they want to review a harmful or offensive reply before they send it. In a test program last year, Twitter said 34% of users "revised their initial reply or decided to not send their reply at all."

Grand gamers

The average age of a video gamer is about 33, but older people are joining the gaming universe in increasing numbers. According to marketing firm GWI’s 2021 Gaming Playbook, adults aged 55-64 are the fastest-growing segment of gamers, posting a 32% increase in the past two years. The report notes that gaming has become important to grandparents, who are using video games as a way of spending family time.

Cryptocurrency regulation urged

A task force of cybersecurity experts, law enforcement agencies and governments pressed the White House to step up regulation of cryptocurrencies in the hopes of controlling a wave of ransomware attacks. Hackers demand ransomware payments in cryptocurrency, which is harder to track and makes it difficult to identify cybercriminals. The task force calls for governments to require cryptocurrency exchanges and brokerages to enforce anti-money laundering and financial terrorism laws.

— BLOOMBERG NEWS

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