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Digital luck of the Irish: St. Patrick's Day websites

Celebrating St. Patrick's Day is a website that

Celebrating St. Patrick's Day is a website that is a one-stop resource on all things St. Patrick's Day from finding parades to music and lyrics of Irish songs. Photo Credit: st-patricks-day.com

There are many ways to celebrate St. Patrick's Day and its traditions, whether it's wearing green, enjoying a parade or eating corned beef and cabbage accompanied by Irish soda bread and Irish stout. Here are some fun and informative websites about the holiday.

Celebrating St. Patrick's Day -- st-patricks-day.com -- is dedicated exclusively to the holiday and provides history, where to find parades and events in the United States and other countries, music and lyrics of Irish songs, as well as recipes and information about Ireland.

History.com dedicates an area -- nwsdy.li/hispat -- to the holiday filled with short (two minutes or less) videos and articles on topics ranging from leprechauns and shamrocks to Irish stew and debunking myths. For example, we learned that although Patrick is a patron saint of Ireland, he was actually born in what is now England, Scotland or Wales. It is also unknown whether his family was of indigenous Celtic descent or hailed from modern-day Italy.

Family Education -- nwsdy.li/fampat -- has St. Patrick's Day activities for kids, including directions for crafts, some using materials you may already have on hand, and holiday-themed games with names like Shamrock Hop. While the kids are playing, the adults can mix up recipes for Irish soda bread and potato leek soup.

St. Patrick's Day Parades -- nwsdy.li/ndpar -- and Irish Pubs nwsdy.li/ndpat) are Newsday's roundups of 2015 St. Patrick's Day parades on Long Island and where you can find a proper pint locally to celebrate.

 

SITES Various, see above

DESCRIPTION Get your green on with websites paying tribute to St. Patrick.

TARGET AUDIENCE Everyone

BOTTOM LINE You don't need the luck of the Irish to enjoy March 17.

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