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Tech review: Meeting slip-ups: Zoom and doom

A survey of executives at companies with 500

A survey of executives at companies with 500 or more employees found about a quarter had fired an employee because of an error made on a video or audio meeting call. Credit: AP/Eric Risberg

Zoom and other video meetings have become everyday events during the pandemic. But they don’t always go smoothly, and some can be disastrous. A Vyopta / Wakefield Research survey of 200 executives at companies with 500 or more employees found that 24% fired an employee because of an error made on a video or audio meeting call. About 40% said they issued a reprimand, and 33% removed an employee from a project. In addition to human error, there’s been technical snafus. Because of connection issues, 75% had to reschedule a meeting, 41% missed a project deadline and 32% lost a business opportunity or client.

Apple sets iPhone 13 debut

Apple will unveil the iPhone 13 at an event on Tuesday. The highly anticipated smartphone is expected to have cutting-edge camera upgrades and higher screen refresh rates, making it a more powerful gaming device. The event, named "California Streaming," is also expected to showcase the next generation of Apple Watches and new AirPods. Apple will also likely announce iOS15, an upgraded operating system for mobile devices.

Write stuff

Sharpen your pencils, sharpen your mind. Participants in a Johns Hopkins University study learned certain language skills faster by handwriting their assignments compared with typing them on a computer. Noting that handwriting "reinforces the visual and aural lessons," researchers said anyone learning a new language, especially languages with different alphabets, should "supplement what they’re learning through apps or tapes with good old-fashioned paperwork."

NYC caps food-delivery fees

New York City lawmakers passed a measure that will make temporary caps on third-party delivery fees permanent in a blow to companies like DoorDash, Grubhub and Uber. The bill prohibits food delivery companies from charging more than 15% per delivery order and more than 5% for other fees. Food delivery companies faced scrutiny during the pandemic for charging commissions as high as 30% of an order. — BLOOMBERG NEWS

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