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Tech review: How to reduce 'Zoom fatigue'? Turn off the camera

As video meetings become essential to remote work,

As video meetings become essential to remote work, some companies are adopting a camera-optional policy. Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto/AndreyPopov

Video meetings have become a required component of remote work, and some companies are adopting a camera-optional policy. If you have this option to turn off your camera, it might save you from "Zoom fatigue." A new University of Arizona study found that video meeting participants who had their cameras on "reported more fatigue than their non-camera using counterparts." The reason: Participants felt "a lot of self-presentation pressure associated with being on camera." And while some companies believe having cameras turned on results in more meeting participation, researchers found the opposite. Because being on camera caused stress and distractions, those with cameras enabled participated less in meetings than those not using cameras.

Twitter to warn on ‘heated’ posts

Most Twitter conversations are cordial, but sometimes the back-and-forth escalates into insults and threats. Twitter is testing prompts on its mobile apps aimed at keeping discussions civil. Twitter says the prompts give users a "heads up if the convo you’re about to enter could get heated or intense." Twitter says the prompts are "a work in progress," so not all users will be seeing them.

Picture of health

Emojis can be more than lighthearted punctuation on texts and emails. A commentary in the Journal of the American Medical Association says the photo icons can be a "powerful way for patients and doctors to communicate," especially for patients not fluent in English, young children and people with disabilities. New emojis would have to be created and approved, however. Only about 45 of the existing 3,500 emojis are relevant to medicine.

Uber begins disposable diaper delivery service

Uber Eats, already delivering groceries, prescriptions, alcohol and flowers in addition to its core restaurant meals, has launched a new delivery category. "Babies and Kids" is aimed at parents in need of emergency diapers, wipes and other necessities. Uber is partnering with national brands including buybuy BABY and Bed Bath & Beyond for the new delivery service.

— BLOOMBERG NEWS

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