Cellphones through the years

An employee at the Samsung Electronics stand shows

An employee at the Samsung Electronics stand shows a revolutionary mobile phone, the Millennium Multimedia Phone IMT-2000, at the opening of the Telecom 99 and Interactive 99 exhibition in Geneva. The world's biggest telecommunications fair will remain open for a week. (Oct. 10, 1999) Photo Credit: Getty Images

The first mobile phone call was made 40 years ago on April 3, 1973, using a Motorola DynaTAC, nicknamed a "brick" because of its size. Four decades later, cellphones are slimmer, sleeker and used for much more than making phone calls. Here is a look at how mobile phones have changed over the years.

Martin Cooper, chairman and CEO of ArrayComm, holds
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Martin Cooper, chairman and CEO of ArrayComm, holds a Motorola DynaTAC. On April 3, 1973, Cooper, then a Motorola employee, used the same model to make the world’s first commercial cellphone call. (April 2, 2003)

Motorola Inc. chairman and CEO Ed Zander shows
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Motorola Inc. chairman and CEO Ed Zander shows off the 1980s-era Motorola DynaTAC 8000, the first commercially available hand-held mobile phone, during his keynote address at the Venetian during the 2007 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. (Jan. 8, 2007)

Chris Brasher talks on a mobile phone during
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Chris Brasher talks on a mobile phone during the London Marathon. (Jan. 1, 1985)

Franck Piccard of France talks on his mobile
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Franck Piccard of France talks on his mobile phone after the men's super G slalom event at the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary, Alberta. (Feb. 28, 1988)

Michiko Matsuo of Kyocera Corp.'s corporate communications displays
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Michiko Matsuo of Kyocera Corp.'s corporate communications displays the company's new Personal Handy-Phone System mobile phone DataScope DS-110. (Feb. 21, 1997)

NTT Central Personal Communications Network Inc., a Japanese
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NTT Central Personal Communications Network Inc., a Japanese mobile phone service provider, unveils a new cellular phone featuring Japanese cartoon character Doraemon in Tokyo. (Dec. 17, 1997)

The R250 PRO dual band phone is the
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The R250 PRO dual band phone is the first mobile phone to support both GSM phase 2+ technology and the GSM Pro system, which will give the users a unique opportunity to combine the advantages of GSM phones with Private Mobile Radio functionality. (Mach 11, 1999)

The wristphone -- By Ntt -- was unveiled
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The wristphone -- By Ntt -- was unveiled at the Demo99 Conference in Indian Wells, Calif. (Feb. 28, 1999)

Ericsson unveiled its new mobile companion MC 218.
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Ericsson unveiled its new mobile companion MC 218. It incorporates a broad set of features specifically related to mobile life, among them WAP functionality and the EPOC operating system. (March 11, 1999)

Ericsson unveiled its new mobile companion MC 218.
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Ericsson unveiled its new mobile companion MC 218. It incorporates a broad set of features specifically related to mobile life, among them WAP functionality and the EPOC operating system. (March 11, 1999)

An employee of Japanese telecommunications company NTT DoCoMo
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An employee of Japanese telecommunications company NTT DoCoMo shows off its latest domestic-use mobile phones F502i Hyper, left, and D502i Hyper at the company's Tokyo office. (Jan. 27, 2000)

An employee at the Samsung Electronics stand shows
Photo Credit: Getty Images

An employee at the Samsung Electronics stand shows a revolutionary mobile phone, the Millennium Multimedia Phone IMT-2000, at the opening of the Telecom 99 and Interactive 99 exhibition in Geneva. The world's biggest telecommunications fair will remain open for a week. (Oct. 10, 1999)

The Handspring Visor handheld personal organizer is seen
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The Handspring Visor handheld personal organizer is seen with the new cellphone attachment. The U.S.-based computer maker Handspring announced that it would start selling the attachment, which transforms the Visor palmtops into cellular phones. (Sept. 25, 2000)

Handspring Inc. introduced a hand-held computer with a
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Handspring Inc. introduced a hand-held computer with a built-in cellphone beating its biggest rivals to what is expected to be a fast-growing market. Called Treo, the 150-gram monochrome display product will go on sale for around $399 in January 2002. (Oct. 15, 2001)

Nokia introduces the N-Gage mobile phone, shown in
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Nokia introduces the N-Gage mobile phone, shown in this handout photo in Munich, Germany. This new device from Nokia, which combines a video game console with a mobile phone, is one of seven new products unveiled by Nokia at the Mobile Internet Conference in Munich. (Nov. 4, 2002)

A message received on a mobile phone displays
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A message received on a mobile phone displays a picture of Saudi-born prime terror suspect Osama bin Laden, with his name in Arabic writing next to it, in the Yemeni capital Sanaa. (Oct. 24, 2001)

A Siemens S55 mobile phone is pictured in
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A Siemens S55 mobile phone is pictured in this undated file photo. Dr. Heinrich von Pierer, president and CEO of German electronics and engineering giant Siemens AG, spoke at the company's annual news conference in Munich, Germany. (Dec. 5, 2002)

An employee of Sanyo Electronics, Nanase Kita, shows
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An employee of Sanyo Electronics, Nanase Kita, shows off a prototype mobile phone with digital TV receiver during its press preview in Tokyo. (Aug. 8, 2003)

A BlackBerry is held Feb. 24, 2006, in
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A BlackBerry is held Feb. 24, 2006, in Chicago. Research in Motion, the makers of BlackBerry, will be in court seeking to prevent an injunction stemming from a patent dispute from shutting down the service. (Feb. 24, 2006)

A model holds the new Nokia 7610 mobile
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A model holds the new Nokia 7610 mobile phone and the Communicator 9500 at the CeBIT technology trade fair. (March 18, 2004)

An employee for Japanese telecommunications company KDDI Network
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An employee for Japanese telecommunications company KDDI Network and Solutions displays a satellite mobile phone in Tokyo as the company launched the service of Iridium's satellite network in Japan this month. (June 17, 2005)

A man presents the latest T-Mobile smartphone MDA
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A man presents the latest T-Mobile smartphone MDA II at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover, Germany. (March 8, 2006)

A large advertisement display of a Sony Ericsson
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A large advertisement display of a Sony Ericsson mobile phone is seen in Singapore. (Feb. 23, 2005)

The Gg01 Bluetooth headset, a wireless headset for
Photo Credit: Getty Images

The Gg01 Bluetooth headset, a wireless headset for cellphones, is shown during COMDEX 2003 in Las Vegas. (Nov. 17, 2003)

Aya Otsuki, an employee for Japanese mobile phone
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Aya Otsuki, an employee for Japanese mobile phone carrier KDDI, displays a tiny thermal SD mobile printer SV-P25, produced by Japanese electronics giant Matsushita Electric Industrial, at the Business Show in Tokyo. (May 22, 2003)

This undated handout image from Sony Ericsson shows
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This undated handout image from Sony Ericsson shows the company's new T610 mobile phone, which features a built-in digital camera and a 65K color screen. The company released the T610, along with the T310, which features a joystick and comes preloaded with video games. (March 4, 2003)

Shown is Sendo International's Z100 multimedia smartphone at
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Shown is Sendo International's Z100 multimedia smartphone at a news conference during the GSM World Congress in Cannes, France. The Z100 phone features a color screen and runs on the Microsoft smartphone platform. ( Feb. 21, 2001)

Japan's mobile communication giant NTT DoCoMo unveils
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Japan's mobile communication giant NTT DoCoMo unveils "i-mode" cellular phone Digital Mova N501i Hyper, which enables online banking, online shopping, ticket reservation, e-mail, online news service, used by mobile 25 January in Tokyo. NTT DoCoMo will start online service next month. (Jan. 26, 1999)

This handout from Motorola shows the MPx wireless
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This handout from Motorola shows the MPx wireless device which is designed to be multi-functional phone with Wi-Fi, General Packet Radio Service technologies, and a fully functioning keyboard. The MPx is expected to be available for sale in the second half of 2004. (July 2, 2004)

A Palm Treo 600 smartphone is seen. PalmOne
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A Palm Treo 600 smartphone is seen. PalmOne Inc. reported a profitable fourth quarter with revenue of $267.3 million, an increase of 23% from the same quarter last year. (June 22, 2004)

A South Korean model shows Samsung Electronics' new
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A South Korean model shows Samsung Electronics' new digital camera mobile phone "SCH-S250", during its unveiling ceremony at the main office in Seoul, 20 October 2004. South Korea's Samsung Electronics said it had developed the world's first mobile phone equipped with a five-megapixel camera. (Oct. 20, 2004)

Japanese mobile communication giant NTT Docomo employee Yoshie
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Japanese mobile communication giant NTT Docomo employee Yoshie Iijima displays a "Tetris" game on a protype model of Docomo's mobile phone which has installed JAVA Script computer language to use as a handy computer terminal, (Sept. 22, 1999)

Rosalie Chong, Marketing Officer for Sony Personel IT
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Rosalie Chong, Marketing Officer for Sony Personel IT displays a new mobile phone, the CMD-Z18 at a press preview 01 August 2000 in Hong Kong. (Aug. 1, 2000)

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