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In the Garage: 1957 Chevrolet 210 Suburban

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER 1957 Chevrolet 210

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER
1957 Chevrolet 210 Suburban owned by Dr. Robert Gerver

WHAT MAKES IT INTERESTING
It's the summer of '62, the Beach Boys are on the radio and the surf's up, so you might easily imagine yourself cruising down to Jones Beach in this very cool 1957 Chevy. While the popularity of '57 Bel Air convertibles and coupes, and the Nomad wagon, is well-documented among collectors (with prices to match), there's now a growing interest in other Chevrolet models from that year, such as Gerver's multi-passenger hauler.

Riding the current wave of interest in unrestored cars, his Chevy has its original interior and "Sierra Gold" and white paint. "Four-door wagons are much harder to find at shows and in car magazines," he says. "They were usually trashed by kids and cargo. The fact that a station wagon interior five decades old has survived in such amazing condition makes this car a rarity."

HOW LONG HE'S OWNED IT
Since 1984

WHERE HE FOUND IT
Gerver was visiting a friend in Schenectady on a rainy weekend and, out of boredom, started to read a local shopping newspaper when he spotted the wagon. "I found the car, went to see it and bought it the following weekend," he says.

CONDITION
According to Gerver, the engine has been rebuilt and most of the mechanical parts -- including the exhaust, suspension and brakes -- have been replaced. While the upholstery and interior headliner are all original, he replaced the rubber floor mat with carpet and added seat belts, a cassette player, clock, dash trim and speakers in the kick panels. Gerver has the original wheel covers, but decided to install the wheels from his 1972 Camaro.

TIPS FOR OWNERS
"It's always nice to be able to drive your old car," he advises. "The immaculate, frame-off (restoration) showpieces are nice, but when they can't be driven because of their pristine condition, the owner becomes a curator rather than a driver. I think those cars are less fun to own."

VALUE
Gerver estimates the value between $15,000 and $20,000, with much of that based on the fact that it is an unrestored wagon.

PERSONAL COMMENTS
Gerver notes that his Chevy has been used in publicity shots for an elementary school production of "Grease" and for a Long Island "oldies" band. "The car has been through 53 years of graceful aging," he says. "I get stopped all over the place every time I take it out. And, if you close your eyes and imagine a few surfboards sticking out of the open tailgate, you can see it in Southern California."

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER
1957 Chevrolet 210 Suburban owned by Dr. Robert Gerver

WHAT MAKES IT INTERESTING
It's the summer of '62, the Beach Boys are on the radio and the surf's up, so you might easily imagine yourself cruising down to Jones Beach in this very cool 1957 Chevy. While the popularity of '57 Bel Air convertibles and coupes, and the Nomad wagon, is well-documented among collectors (with prices to match), there's now a growing interest in other Chevrolet models from that year, such as Gerver's multi-passenger hauler.

Riding the current wave of interest in unrestored cars, his Chevy has its original interior and "Sierra Gold" and white paint. "Four-door wagons are much harder to find at shows and in car magazines," he says. "They were usually trashed by kids and cargo. The fact that a station wagon interior five decades old has survived in such amazing condition makes this car a rarity."

HOW LONG HE'S OWNED IT
Since 1984

WHERE HE FOUND IT
Gerver was visiting a friend in Schenectady on a rainy weekend and, out of boredom, started to read a local shopping newspaper when he spotted the wagon. "I found the car, went to see it and bought it the following weekend," he says.

CONDITION
According to Gerver, the engine has been rebuilt and most of the mechanical parts -- including the exhaust, suspension and brakes -- have been replaced. While the upholstery and interior headliner are all original, he replaced the rubber floor mat with carpet and added seat belts, a cassette player, clock, dash trim and speakers in the kick panels. Gerver has the original wheel covers, but decided to install the wheels from his 1972 Camaro.

TIPS FOR OWNERS
"It's always nice to be able to drive your old car," he advises. "The immaculate, frame-off (restoration) showpieces are nice, but when they can't be driven because of their pristine condition, the owner becomes a curator rather than a driver. I think those cars are less fun to own."

VALUE
Gerver estimates the value between $15,000 and $20,000, with much of that based on the fact that it is an unrestored wagon.

PERSONAL COMMENTS
Gerver notes that his Chevy has been used in publicity shots for an elementary school production of "Grease" and for a Long Island "oldies" band. "The car has been through 53 years of graceful aging," he says. "I get stopped all over the place every time I take it out. And, if you close your eyes and imagine a few surfboards sticking out of the open tailgate, you can see it in Southern California."

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