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In the Garage: 1986 Mercury Capri 5.0L

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER 1986 Mercury Capri

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER
1986 Mercury Capri 5.0L owned by Edward Prete

WHAT MAKES IT INTERESTING
Lincoln-Mercury cited its 1986 Capri as "a car for people who take driving seriously, for people who want a car that provides more than just day-to-day transportation." Produced from 1979 through 1986, the Capri was a re-badged clone of the highly popular Ford Mustang, although, as Prete noted, his car has added styling cues, including "strongly defined fender flares" and a "bubble back" hatch. "Mechanically, it shares the same power train and underpinnings as a Ford Mustang GT," Prete said, "with the tried-and-true 5.0-liter V-8 engine backed by a five-speed manual transmission, giving a good balance of performance and reliability. Unfortunately, lackluster sales and limited production of less than 4,000 5.0L Capri's built in '86 resulted in its untimely demise. With this being the 'swan song' year for the Capri, it's the only model year with Sequential Electronic Fuel Injection (SEFI). Those features are two of the main draws to the Capri crowd for this specific model year."

HOW LONG HE'S OWNED IT
For about a year and a half

WHERE HE FOUND IT
Prete needed approximately a year before he found the right car on an enthusiast web site and brought it back from Texas.

CONDITION
"I am most of the way through a 'frame-on' rejuvenation," Prete said. "The car was in remarkable shape for being 23 years old and having 181,000 miles on it. Since the Capri was a limited-run car, some body parts are harder to find. At this point in the process, most of the more difficult work is complete."

TIPS FOR OWNERS
"Visit car shows or join an enthusiast web site that caters to your 'dream machine,'" Prete advised. "Study the market, ask questions and read technical articles. Get a full understanding of everything about the car and what repair costs may be like if you cannot tackle it yourself. And, most of all, never forget what you envision as the end result."

VALUE
"In its current condition, with what has been put into restoring it, (the value is) likely in the vicinity of $7,500," he said. "My appreciation for it is priceless."

PERSONAL COMMENTS
"This was one of several cars I dreamt of in high school, and it took me almost 20 years to finally get it," Prete said. "It was well worth the wait."

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER
1986 Mercury Capri 5.0L owned by Edward Prete

WHAT MAKES IT INTERESTING
Lincoln-Mercury cited its 1986 Capri as "a car for people who take driving seriously, for people who want a car that provides more than just day-to-day transportation." Produced from 1979 through 1986, the Capri was a re-badged clone of the highly popular Ford Mustang, although, as Prete noted, his car has added styling cues, including "strongly defined fender flares" and a "bubble back" hatch.

"Mechanically, it shares the same power train and underpinnings as a Ford Mustang GT," Prete said, "with the tried-and-true 5.0-liter V-8 engine backed by a five-speed manual transmission, giving a good balance of performance and reliability. Unfortunately, lackluster sales and limited production of less than 4,000 5.0L Capri's built in '86 resulted in its untimely demise.

With this being the 'swan song' year for the Capri, it's the only model year with Sequential Electronic Fuel Injection (SEFI). Those features are two of the main draws to the Capri crowd for this specific model year."

HOW LONG HE'S OWNED IT
For about a year and a half

WHERE HE FOUND IT
Prete needed approximately a year before he found the right car on an enthusiast web site and brought it back from Texas.

CONDITION
"I am most of the way through a 'frame-on' rejuvenation," Prete said. "The car was in remarkable shape for being 23 years old and having 181,000 miles on it. Since the Capri was a limited-run car, some body parts are harder to find. At this point in the process, most of the more difficult work is complete."

TIPS FOR OWNERS
"Visit car shows or join an enthusiast web site that caters to your 'dream machine,'" Prete advised. "Study the market, ask questions and read technical articles. Get a full understanding of everything about the car and what repair costs may be like if you cannot tackle it yourself. And, most of all, never forget what you envision as the end result."

VALUE
"In its current condition, with what has been put into restoring it, (the value is) likely in the vicinity of $7,500," he said. "My appreciation for it is priceless."

PERSONAL COMMENTS
"This was one of several cars I dreamt of in high school, and it took me almost 20 years to finally get it," Prete said. "It was well worth the wait."

If you want to show off your car, e-mail your information and a jpg photo (at least 200 dpi) for consideration to David Fluhrer, Newsday Wheels; thegarage@optonline.net or fax: 631-843-3146.

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