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5 nursing career specialties to pursue in 2019

Healthcare is one of the fastest-growing fields right

Healthcare is one of the fastest-growing fields right now--and nursing is at the heart of this growth. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nursing profession is expected to grow by at least 19% by 2026, much faster than average for all jobs. If you're thinking about a career in nursing, here are […]

Healthcare is one of the fastest-growing fields right now—and nursing is at the heart of this growth. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nursing profession is expected to grow by at least 19% by 2026, much faster than average for all jobs.

If you’re thinking about a career in nursing, here are five fast-growing specialties to consider.

Nurse Practitioner

Nurse practitioners (also known as advanced practice registered nurses, or APRNs) are an MVP when it comes to family or general medical practices. They provide standard nursing care (recording patient histories, examining patients, performing diagnostic tests, administer medicine or treatments), while also being able to perform tasks usually done by physicians, like prescribing medicine, ordering tests, and diagnosing illnesses.

What you’ll need: A master’s degree in nursing, plus passing a national certification exam and becoming licensed. Each state’s licensing requirements may vary, so be sure to check your own state’s requirements.

What it pays: The median salary for nurse practitioners is $110,930 per year, or $53.33 per hour.

The outlook: The number of nurse practitioner jobs is expected to grow by an incredible 31% by 2026.

Neonatal Nurse

Neonatal nurses care for premature babies, usually in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in a hospital. Because of the critical health problems experienced by many newborns, neonatal nurses provide essential, extensive care.

What you’ll need: A bachelor’s degree in nursing, plus specialized training. You’ll need to be licensed as well. Each state’s licensing requirements may vary, so be sure to check your own state’s requirements.

What it pays: The median salary for neonatal nurses is $65,000 per year, or $31.25 per hour.

The outlook: The number of neonatal nurse jobs is expected to grow at least 17% by 2026.

Nurse Midwife

Nurse midwives are advanced practice nurses who care for expectant mothers and their newborns. A nurse midwife coordinates care during pregnancy and assists during childbirth and after the delivery for both the mother and baby.

What you’ll need: A bachelor’s degree in nursing, plus specialized training. You’ll need to be licensed as well. Each state’s licensing requirements may vary, so be sure to check your own state’s requirements.

What it pays: The median salary for nurse midwives is $100,590 per year, or $48.36 per hour.

The outlook: The number of nurse midwife jobs is expected to grow at least 31% by 2026.

Nurse Anesthetist

One of the fastest-growing and highest-paying nursing specialties is the nurse anesthetist. Nurse anesthetists provide anesthesia to surgical patients, working with physicians, surgeons, and other operating room staff. In addition to anesthesia, nurse anesthetists may help coordinate pre-and post-surgical care for patients as well.

What you’ll need: A bachelor’s degree in nursing, plus a master’s degree and/or specialized training in nurse anesthesia. You’ll need to be licensed as well. Each state’s licensing requirements may vary, so be sure to check your own state’s requirements.

What it pays: The median salary for nurse anesthetists is $160,270 per year, or $77.05 per hour.

The outlook: The number of nurse anesthetist jobs is expected to grow at least 22% by 2026.

Nurse Educator

One of the most valuable roles in the nursing community is teaching the next waves of nurses. This crucial role combines medical and clinical skills with teaching skills, and can be a good fit for nurses who have strong communication and leadership skills. Nurse educators may teach and train nurses at all levels, from specialized nursing training programs to bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate nursing programs. The constant demand for high-quality nurses means that there is high demand for nursing teachers as well.

What you’ll need: A bachelor’s degree in nursing, and potentially a master’s degree or PhD, depending on what you’ll be teaching. You may also need specific clinical experience, depending on the program.

What it pays: The median salary for nurse educators is $71,260 per year.

The outlook: The number of nurse educator jobs is expected to grow at least 19% by 2026.

Whichever nursing path you choose, know that it’s a rewarding, challenging field with many opportunities open to explore your specific passion and talent.

The post 5 nursing career specialties to pursue in 2019 appeared first on TheJobNetwork.

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