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Crooner Perry Como’s former Sands Point home lists for $3.95M

The 1937 Colonial comes with two subdividable tracts,

The 1937 Colonial comes with two subdividable tracts, the listing agent says. Photo Credit: Douglas Elliman Real Estate / Robert Anthony DeRosa

The Sands Point house that once belonged to famed singer and television personality Perry Como is on the market for $3.95 million.

Painted on the wall of the bathroom in the lower level of the home is a caricature of Como with music notes and the quote, “Ladies will please stay seated during the entire performance.”

“It’s very cute,” says listing agent Jill Berman of Douglas Elliman Real Estate. “They kept that there for posterity.”

The 1937 Colonial, with six bedrooms, four full bathrooms and two half-baths, sits on a 2.5-acre property. Off the step-down living room, which includes one of the home’s five fireplaces, is a family room that Como added as an extension, says Berman. The main level also includes a chef’s kitchen with a breakfast area, a formal dining room and an office. A bridal staircase leads to the upper level that features a master suite with a dressing room and new bathroom, as well as five additional bedrooms and three baths.

The property, with a circular driveway, boasts an in-ground pool and a cabana lined with a scrolled wrought iron facade that “gives it an old Hollywood-style look,” Berman says. The property includes two separate tax lots, each 1 1⁄4 acres, offering the opportunity to subdivide, she adds.

A 1990 article from The New York Times states that Como lived in Sands Point for most of his singing career. He raised his three children there, the story says, before moving to Florida in the 1970s.

With a crooning, easy-listening voice, Como had a career that spanned more than six decades. He produced multiple No. 1 singles, the first of which was “Till the End of Time,” which spent 10 weeks atop the Billboard charts in 1945. Como, who died in 2001, also starred in four movies in the 1940s, earned five Emmy Awards while hosting variety shows on television in the 1950s, and was also known for his Christmas television specials.

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