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TV designers buy Montauk home from Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue photographer

Inside the Montauk home.

Inside the Montauk home. Credit: Nest Seekers International

Fashion photographer and artist Raphael Mazzucco recently sold his Montauk home to TV interior designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent for close to the asking price of $1.9 million, says listing agent Dylan Eckardt of Nest Seekers International.

Mazzucco wanted to make sure that the new owners would not level the house, says Eckardt.

Berkus and Brent "love Raphael,” Eckardt says. “They are fans of his art and photography. We actually left some art pieces for them as a gift.”

Mazzucco has shot covers for Vogue and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues numerous times and worked on advertising campaigns for Ralph Lauren and Victoria’s Secret. In recent years, he has incorporated his photography into large-scale works that blend female forms with nature scenes.

As the resident interior designer on "The Oprah Winfrey Show," Berkus renovated more than 100 spaces. After serving as assistant to designer Rachel Zoe on her “Rachel Zoe Project” realty TV show, Brent launched his own design firm. Berkus and Brent host TLC's "Nate and Jeremiah By Design" in which the couple help people tackle renovations, focusing on design, budget and lifestyle. 

“You just never know who’s going to live there, but I couldn’t think of a better couple than Nate and Jeremy,” says Mazzucco, who is now building a studio and cabins on his 100-acre Lebanon, Connecticut, property. “They’re just awesome. I’m excited to one day see what they do with it. I know it’s going to be truly gorgeous.”

The 3,500-square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bathroom Contemporary home features a rooftop deck that overlooks Fort Pond Bay. The 0.96-acre property contains a swimming pool, two koi ponds and meandering gravel paths.

Mazzucco bought the house 18 years ago. The first thing he did was paint it, remove decking and remove sliders in the living room, he says. “What I did with it over the years was to make it very comfortable to live in, but also photograph and do art and have people over,” Mazzucco says. “It was that type of house.”
 

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