TODAY'S PAPER
Good Morning
Good Morning
EntertainmentBooks

12 new books to take to the beach this summer

The summer of 2021 rides in on a tidal wave of much-anticipated books, most of which will crash up on our shores in June. There are thrillers — political, erotic and comic. There are linked short stories, and memoirs of identity and inspiration. And whatever we are calling chick lit these days, it is showing up in a variety of wonderful flavors. Also coming out are a few more serious works you may find intriguing.

If the literary options are any indication, it's going to be a great summer on the beaches of Long Island.

SUMMER ON THE BLUFFS by Sunny Hostin

Hostin sets her juicy debut in Oak Bluffs,
Credit: William Morrow/HarperCollins

Hostin sets her juicy debut in Oak Bluffs, an elite Black enclave on Martha's Vineyard, where a widowed Black millionairess is ready to pass on her mansion to one of her three goddaughters. They gather at Chateau Laveau, but won't find out who gets the house until the end of the summer. (William Morrow/HarperCollins, out already)

THE BIG VAPE: The Incendiary Rise of Juul by Jamie Ducharme

f you are a parent of a certain
Credit: Henry Holt

If you are a parent of a certain age, you probably remember when something called a "Juul pod" appeared in your home. Here's the story of how two Stanford students trying to quit smoking dreamed up a dangerous, targeted product that created a new generation of addicts. Reads like a nonfiction thriller. (Holt, out already)

THE OTHER BLACK GIRL by Zakiya Dalila Harris

Already being called "the book of the summer,"
Credit: Atria

Already being called "the book of the summer," this workplace drama combines suspense and horror with social satire. A 26-year-old fed up with micro-aggressions and more in her office is at first happy to see her eponymous new colleague. Then the vibes turn weird, and the page-turning plot twists begin. (Atria, out already)

GOLDEN GIRL by Elin Hilderbrand

Summer essentials: towel, umbrella and the latest Hilderbrand.
Credit: Little, Brown

Summer essentials: towel, umbrella and the latest Hilderbrand. A Nantucket novelist is hit by car and killed while jogging, but it's not all bad. She is happy to learn that she not only gets to watch the doings of her family and friends from the afterlife, but has three chances to intervene. Comes with beautiful food and enviable real estate. (Little Brown, out already)

THE PRESIDENT'S DAUGHTER by Bill Clinton and James Patterson

The Oval Office hero of Jim and Bill's
Credit: Little, Brown/Knopf

The Oval Office hero of Jim and Bill's maiden effort has just lost re-election to his veep when jihadis seeking revenge kidnap his daughter. Hundreds of Long Island fans queued up when the duo visited Book Revue in Huntington in 2018; their sequel will doubtless be a beach-blanket staple this summer. (Little Brown/Knopf, June 7)ANIMAL, by Lisa Taddeo"If someone asked me to describe myself in a single word, depraved is the one I would use," says Joan. No argument there, but as she unfolds her story, we learn how she earned her  darkness and rage, and somehow we never completely stop rooting for her. An intense emotional thriller, full of sex and violence. (Avid Reader, June 8)

ANIMAL by Lisa Taddeo

"If someone asked me to describe myself in
Credit: Avid Reader

"If someone asked me to describe myself in a single word, depraved is the one I would use," says Joan. No argument there, but as she unfolds her story, we learn how she earned her  darkness and rage, and somehow we never completely stop rooting for her. An intense emotional thriller, full of sex and violence. (Avid Reader, June 8)

KIN by Shawna Kay Rodenberg

Rodenberg's unusual childhood was spent partly in her
Credit: Bloomsbury

Rodenberg's unusual childhood was spent partly in her family's ancestral Appalachian home and partly in a Minnesota end-times cult her father joined in the wake of his shattering experiences in Vietnam. Those experiences are illuminated in this memoir by brilliantly detailed writing. Scorning the stereotypes, she gives us a story about forgiveness and love. (Bloomsbury, June 8)

MISEDUCATED by Brandon P. Fleming

Fleming was a deeply troubled boy who had
Credit: Hachette

Fleming was a deeply troubled boy who had barely learned to read when a basketball scholarship took him to college -- then a career-ending injury dropped him lower than square one. How did this guy end up coaching debate in the Ivy League? This hood-to-Harvard memoir will inspire readers of all ages. (Hachette, June 15)

FILTHY ANIMALS by Brandon Taylor

Last year, Taylor's debut novel "Real Life" made
Credit: Riverhead

Last year, Taylor's debut novel "Real Life" made the Man Booker shortlist and is now heading to the screen starring Kid Cudi. No surprise that there's plenty of buzz about his coming collection of linked stories. In and out of them drift three artsy young Midwesterners who meet at a potluck. (Riverhead, June 22)

INCENSE AND SENSIBILITY by Sonali Dev

People have been going crazy for Dev's Jane
Credit: William Morrow

People have been going crazy for Dev's Jane Austen-inspired novels and this is No. 3. The Rajes are a once-royal Indian family who immigrated to San Francisco, and here favorite son Yash Raje is running for governor in California. When his friend is shot at a rally, a yoga teacher is called in to help him deal. (Morrow, July 6)

THE FINAL GIRL SUPPORT GROUP by Grady Hendrix

THE FINAL GIRL SUPPORT GROUP, by Grady HendrixIf
Credit: Berkley

THE FINAL GIRL SUPPORT GROUP, by Grady HendrixIf you love "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and "Nightmare on Elm Street," or even if you're not a slasher movie fan, check out this half-send-up, half-serious take on horror film tropes. It centers around a support group for "final girls" -- the girls who survived the massacre. Then one of them disappears. (Berkley, July 13)

CONTROLLING WOMEN by Julie Kay and Kathryn Kolbert

Two lawyers recount their landmark cases defending abortion
Credit: Hachette

Two lawyers recount their landmark cases defending abortion as well as some of the heartbreaking and outrageous things that have happened where it is prohibited.  Given the current makeup of the Supreme Court, they argue that activism must shift focus, making reproductive freedom a human rights issue. (Hachette, July 13)

More Entertainment