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Neil Patrick Harris calls out James Woods over homophobic tweet

Neil Patrick Harris, left, and James Woods.

Neil Patrick Harris, left, and James Woods. Photo Credit: Getty Images / Dimitrios Kambouris; WGAw/ Alberto E. Rodriguez

Neil Patrick Harris has responded to a homophobic tweet actor James Woods directed at a family that had posted an image supporting their son at a gay-pride event.

“Utterly ignorant and classless, Mr. Woods,” tweeted actor and gay-rights advocate Harris, 44. “I’m friends with this family. You know not of what you speak, and should be ashamed of yourself.”

Woods, 70, had tweeted an image of blogger Lori Duron, author of Random House’s “Raising My Rainbow: Adventures in Raising a Fabulous, Gender Creative Son,” at OC Pride in Orange County, California, last month, holding a sign that read, “I [heart symbol] My Gender Creative Son!” Her husband, police officer Matt Duron, held one reading, “My Son Wears Dresses & Makeup . . . Get Over It!” Between them, smiling and dressed in pants and a T-shirt, was 10-year-old C.J., one of the couple’s two sons.

“This is sweet,” wrote Woods. “Wait until this poor kid grows up, realizes what you’ve done, and stuffs both of you dismembered into a freezer in the garage.”

Woods’ tweet had received 28,000 likes as of early Wednesday afternoon. Harris’ rejoinder had gotten 78,000.

The LGBTQ advocacy group Human Rights Campaign tweeted in support of Harris, writing, “Thank you @ActuallyNPH for taking a stand against this vulgar & hateful statement. All children should be accepted & loved for who they are.”

Actor Andy Milder (“Weeds”), 48, also tweeted in response to Woods. “When did you dismember your humanity and stuff it in a freezer in the garage?” he wrote. “Why does anyone have anything to say about this family who supports their child? . . . So you should mock them on Twitter to millions?”

The Durons have long expressed pride in their son, with Matt Duron, a firefighter before switching to law enforcement, writing in The Atlantic in 2013, “To me, loving a child who is different, a target and seen as vulnerable is my role as a father and decent human being . . . My son skipping and twirling in a dress isn’t a sign that a strong male figure is missing from his life; to me it’s a sign that a strong male figure is fully vested in his life and committed to protecting him and allowing him to grow into the person who he was created to be.”

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