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Must-see museum exhibits on Long Island 

Hofstra students Allison Wolf and Shaina Martin browse

Hofstra students Allison Wolf and Shaina Martin browse the Emily Lowe Gallery on Hofstra University campus in Hempstead.  Credit: Raychel Brightman

From a centennial observance marking the end of World War I and its influence on visual artists to a century of art depicting wildlife, Long Island museums cover a lot of time and space. In between, you’ll find modern Latin American art and collaborative collages created with a hand from the postal service. Here’s what happening this fall.

CHANGING PERCEPTIONS: WORLD WAR I

AND THE VISUAL ARTS

Through Dec. 14, Emily Lowe Gallery,

Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead

The “War to End All Wars,” which devastatingly morphed later into World War II, shifted the perception of war as heroic and romanticized into starkly horrific reality. Paintings by George Grosz, prints by Marc Chagall, photographs by August Sander and works drawn from outside the Hofstra collection reflect this sobering perspective in an exhibition marking 100 years since the end of World War I.

INFO 516-463-5672, hofstra.edu/museum

SHAPING SILVER: CONTEMPORARY METALSMITHING

Through Dec. 30, Long Island Museum,

1200 Rte. 25A, Stony Brook

A companion exhibit to one on the works by Colonial silversmith Elias Pelletreau, “Shaping Silver” focuses on artists living in New York and Long Island: Michele Oka Doner, known for her public art installations; Michael Izrael Galmer, a Lenox and Tiffany designer; Brian Weissman and Erin Shay Daily, co-founders of Brooklyn Metal Works; Wendy Yothers, a Pratt Institute professor whose works are in the Smithsonian Institution and Corning Museum of Glass collections; Patricia Madeja, a West Islip-based jewelry artist also on the Pratt faculty, and Eric Messin, resident jewelry maker and silversmith at Southampton’s Pelletreau Silver Shop.

INFO 631-751-0066, longislandmuseum.org

SYD SOLOMON and PLEASE SEND TO: RAY JOHNSON

Oct. 20-Dec. 17, Guild Hall,

158 Main St., East Hampton

Through his New York Correspondence School in the 1950s, Ray Johnson started his own art movement — Mail Art. Johnson networked with other artists to whom he mailed drawings, poems and collages, asking them to add their touches and forward it to another member of the group. Guild Hall’s second major gallery will explore the career of Syd Solomon, self-described “Abstract Impressionist” whose paintings were inspired by the natural environment surrounding his homes in the Hamptons and Florida.

INFO 631-324-0806, guildhall.org

LOUISA CHASE: BELOW THE SURFACE and

INTO THE ARTIST’S WORLD: PHOTOGRAPHS OF

FRED W. McDARRAH

Nov. 11-Oct. 27, 2019, Parrish Art Museum,

279 Montauk Hwy., Water Mill

Two exhibits drawn from the Parrish’s permanent collection of more than 3,000 works headline the museum’s fall season, along with Keith Sonnier’s solo show running through Jan. 29. The Louisa Chase Estate organized this retrospective of her paintings and works on paper with the museum. Chase’s works (she died in 2016) are in the Parrish collection as well as those at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and have been selected for the Venice Biennale. The McDarrah show features photos of master artists at work in their studios, including Elaine and Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Motherwell and James Brooks, all of whom once painted in the Hamptons.

INFO 631-283-2118, parrishart.org

RIVER AND BEYOND: LATIN AMERICAN ART FROM

THE JOAN AND MILTON BAGLEY COLLECTION

Nov. 17-March 31, Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington

The Bagleys of Woodbury have collected Latin American art for more than four decades, including works by 20th and 21st century artists from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and Venezuela. Paintings by Mexican master Diego Rivera are featured with those of Cuba’s Wilfredo Lam and sculptures by Chile’s Fernando Botero. Of their collection, the Bagleys write: “The subjects, the colors, the unpretentious style . . . were a joy to our eyes.”

INFO 631-351-3250, heckscher.org

WILD KINGDOM: HUNT SLONEM AND

A HUNDRED YEARS OF ANIMAL ART

Nov. 17-March 3, Nassau County Museum of Art,

1 Museum Dr., Roslyn Harbor

Considered one of the foremost living American artists painting, sculpting and making prints of tropical birds and other creatures in exotic settings, Slonem headlines an exhibition curated by Franklin Hill Perrell. It ranges from French artist Jean de Brunhoff’s Babar the elephant to bullfights depicted by Pablo Picasso.

INFO 516-484-9337, nassaumuseum.org

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