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Van Wyck-Lefferts Tide Grist Mill

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society explains

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society explains mechanical functions of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill to a tour group in Huntington. (July 9, 2012) Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

The three-story Van Wyck-Lefferts Tide Grist Mill stands as a relic of centuries past, contrasting sharply with the modern houses and boats around it in Huntington. Visitors can take a boat ride on the bay, climb to the second story of the building and get a history lesson of the mill -- where flour was once made -- on a two-hour tour of the mill.

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society leads
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society leads a group on a tour of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner, center and of the Huntington Historical
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner, center and of the Huntington Historical Society, points out features of the Huntington harbor to a tour group during a short boat trip from Gold Star Battalion beach to the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

A tour group by boat approaches the Van
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

A tour group by boat approaches the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill, a historic building overlooking the Huntington harbor. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner, center and of the Huntington Historical
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner, center and of the Huntington Historical Society, introduces the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill to a tour group before departing from Gold Star Battalion beach in Huntington to see the historic building up-close. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society explains
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society explains mechanical functions of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill to a tour group in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner, left and of the Huntington Historical
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner, left and of the Huntington Historical Society, explains the use of a milling tool called a "Shoe" to a tour group inside of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

Lee Levy, left and of Huntington, and assistant
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Lee Levy, left and of Huntington, and assistant tour guide Tony Salajka, right, take a look at the inside of the ground level of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington as Bob Rubner of the Huntington Historical Society enters the mill. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner, center left and of the Huntington
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner, center left and of the Huntington Historical Society, explains the use of overhead shafts in the milling process to a tour group inside of the Van Wyck - Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

Bob Rubner, left and of the Huntington Historical
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Bob Rubner, left and of the Huntington Historical Society, explains the use and maintenence of a grinding stone to a tour group inside of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

An old grinding stone with original leather belts
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

An old grinding stone with original leather belts is mounted to the floor inside of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

Visitors can still see a stamp imprint on
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Visitors can still see a stamp imprint on the wood work bearing the name of Abraham Van Wyck, the builder of the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill in Huntington. (July 9, 2012)

A historic photo made late in the19th century,
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

A historic photo made late in the19th century, courtesy of the Huntington Historical Society, shows how the Van Wyck Lefferts tidal grist mill once looked as a fully operational mill. (July 11, 2012)

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