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Best new movies available On Demand

"Wonder Woman," "Baywatch" and more: See film critic Rafer Guzman's picks for the Oscar winners, box office hits and independent films that are available to watch On Demand, whether you subscribe to Optimum, Time Warner Cable, DirecTV, Dish or Verizon. Dates of availability may vary based on provider.

"Patti Cake$"

In North New Jersey, an aspiring rapper dreams
Photo Credit: Fox Searchlight / Jeong Park

In North New Jersey, an aspiring rapper dreams of wealth and fame. The problem is, she's white, female and plus-sized. Newcomer Danielle Macdonald is terrific as the scrappy, working-class heroine of this quirky comedy-drama from first-time filmmaker Geremy Jasper. Read our review here.

"Kong: Skull Island"

The newest entry in the patchy King Kong
Photo Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures / Chuck Zlotnick

The newest entry in the patchy King Kong series feels remarkably fresh, somewhere between big-budget monster movie and Vietnam War film. Dazzling direction by Jordan Vogt-Roberts and a top-flight cast (Tom Hiddleston, John C. Reilly, Brie Larson) make this a must-see. Read our review here.

"The Boss Baby"

Alec Baldwin is quite funny as the voice
Photo Credit: AP

Alec Baldwin is quite funny as the voice of a suit-wearing infant in this animated movie, but be warned: "The Boss Baby" has a pabulum-like plot. Kids won't care, thanks to a preponderance of slapstick antics and diaper jokes. Read our review here.

"My Cousin Rachel"

In 19th century England, a sheltered young man
Photo Credit: TNS/Nicola Dove/Fox Searchlight

In 19th century England, a sheltered young man (Sam Claflin) falls for a mysterious woman (Rachel Weisz) who may be trying to kill him. It's a handsome, elegant production with a Gothic chill from director Roger Michell ("Notting Hill"). Read our review here.

"Table 19"

Anna Kendrick attends the wedding of an ex-boyfriend
Photo Credit: AP

Anna Kendrick attends the wedding of an ex-boyfriend and finds that she's been seated at a table of outcasts. The story is obviously modeled on "The Breakfast Club" -- the princess, the basket case, etc. -- but it makes little sense in the context of a wedding. Too bad, because Craig Robinson, June Squibb, Stephen Merchant and Lisa Kudrow could have made a great ensemble.

"The Belko Experiment"

In a remote office building, 80 office workers
Photo Credit: MGM

In a remote office building, 80 office workers are held captive and told they must kill one another. Nasty fun, thanks to entertaining character actors such as John C. McGinley and Tony Goldwyn. Read our review here.

"The Zookeeper's Wife"

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Zabinska, a real-life
Photo Credit: Focus Features / Anne Marie Fox

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Zabinska, a real-life woman who helped shelter about 300 Jews in Poland's Warsaw Zoo during World War II. Handsomely made, though somewhat grit-free for a Holocaust film. Read our review here.

"The Circle"

A young techie (Emma Watson) joins a Silicon
Photo Credit: STX Entertainment

A young techie (Emma Watson) joins a Silicon Valley company bent on improving the world by eradicating privacy. It's a shallow dig into a deep subject, and not a very effective thriller, either. Also starring Tom Hanks. Read our review here.

"A Dog's Purpose"

A golden retriever finds himself reincarnated as different
Photo Credit: AP

A golden retriever finds himself reincarnated as different breeds with different human owners. This is a mostly family-friendly weeper, marred by some dark moments of violence and suffering. With Britt Robertson and Dennis Quaid. Read our review here.

"Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2"

Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana and the gang return
Photo Credit: Disney / Marvel

Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana and the gang return in this Marvel sequel, which cranks up the music, the comedy and the bloodshed. It's not nearly as fresh as the first, but audiences ate it up to the tune of $860 million worldwide. Read our review here.

"Disneynature: Born in China"

Disney's latest nature doc features a grab-bag of
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Company

Disney's latest nature doc features a grab-bag of Chinese animals (panda, monkey, leopard) with narration by John Krasinski. Note to parents: Not all the critters survive. Read our review here.

"It Comes at Night"

In the aftermath of an unexplained pandemic, an
Photo Credit: A24 / Eric McNatt

In the aftermath of an unexplained pandemic, an isolated family opens its doors to a young couple in trouble. Joel Edgerton and Carmen Ejogo lead a very good cast in this atmospheric, sometimes brutal and -- truth be told -- somewhat nebulous horror film. Directed by Trey Edward Shults ("Krisha"). Read our review here.

"Going in Style"

Three senior citizens decide to hold up a
Photo Credit: ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA

Three senior citizens decide to hold up a bank. Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin keep this heist film breezy and pleasant, though it pales next to the poignant original (from 1979) with George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg. Read our review here.

"Saban's Power Rangers"

A big-screen version of the junk-TV show in
Photo Credit: AP

A big-screen version of the junk-TV show in which five teenagers are granted superpowers by an alien being. This is an attempt at an update for the Marvel age, but the combination of teen-level innuendo, rugged action and kid-friendly comedy proves fatal. With Dacre Montgomery and Naomi Scott. Read our review here.

"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword"

Guy Ritchie's version of the British myth is
Photo Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures/Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Guy Ritchie's version of the British myth is a confused mix of thunderous fantasy and street-smart cheekiness, but it works passably well as a pure, brainless spectacle. With Charlie Hunnam and Astrid Berges-Frisbey. Read our review here.

"The Fate of the Furious"

Not the strongest entry in the series, but
Photo Credit: Universal Pictures/Matt Kennedy

Not the strongest entry in the series, but it offers plenty of slick action with the usual charismatic cast (Vin Diesel, Jason Statham, Dwayne Johnson). New addition Charlize Theron brings an icy-sexy vibe to the villain, a super-hacker named Cipher. Also available in the Extended Director's Cut. Read our review here.

"All Eyez On Me"

More than 20 years after his still-unsolved murder,
Photo Credit: Quantrell Colbert

More than 20 years after his still-unsolved murder, the rapper Tupac Shakur finally gets the biopic treatment. It is, however, a near-total disaster, with audibly off-key dialogue and stiff pacing by director Benny Boom. The actor who plays Shakur, Demetrius Shipp Jr., isn't bad, though, and bears a striking physical resemblance. here.

"Snatched"

Goldie Hawn and Amy Schumer play a mother
Photo Credit: Twentieth Century Fox / Justina Mintz

Goldie Hawn and Amy Schumer play a mother and daughter kidnapped during a vacation in Ecuador. It's the usual R-rated stuff, with a few decent laughs, but not the comedy gold it could have been. Read our review here.

"Megan Leavey"

The true-life story of a U.S. Marine (Kate
Photo Credit: TNS / Bleecker Street Media

The true-life story of a U.S. Marine (Kate Mara in the title role) who forms a powerful bond with her canine comrade. It's a little uneven in tone, somewhere between grown-up war film and family-friendly heart-warmer, but it has some nice moments and a convincing performance from Common as a no-nonsense sergeant. Read our review here.

"Wish Upon"

A lonely teenager (Joey King) discovers a box
Photo Credit: Broad Green Pictures / Steve Wilkie

A lonely teenager (Joey King) discovers a box that will grant her seven wishes -- but each comes with a price. Basically, it's "The Twilight Zone" meets "Mean Girls," but that's not a bad thing. Manage your expectations and you might get a kick out of it. With Ryan Phillippe. Read our review here.

"Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie"

Fans of the endearingly lowbrow book series by
Photo Credit: AP

Fans of the endearingly lowbrow book series by Dav Pilkey will be thrilled by this animated adaptation. The plot is too ridiculous to explain; just know that the voice cast is quite good (Kevin Hart and Thomas Middleditch play two fourth-grade pranksters) and there are enough jokes to keep adults snickering, too. Read our review here.

"Wonder Woman"

The superhero movie of the year won't look
Photo Credit: Warner Bros. Entertainment / Clay Enos

The superhero movie of the year won't look quite the same on the small screen, but it has more to offer than just spectacle. Gal Gadot is riveting in the statuesque title role; Chris Pine does a lovely job as the World War I soldier who steals her heart; and the whole movie just brims with energy, warmth and intelligence. Read our review here.

"Menashe"

Newly minted actor Menashe Lustig plays a version
Photo Credit: Wehkamp Photography

Newly minted actor Menashe Lustig plays a version of himself: a widowed Hasidic Jew who is not allowed to live with his son unless he remarries. Shot in secret in Brooklyn's Hasidic neighborhoods, it's a fascinating peek into a foreign culture right here at home. Read our review here.

"The Founder"

The story of Ray Kroc, the man who
Photo Credit: TNS / The Weinstein Company

The story of Ray Kroc, the man who founded -- or rather, found -- McDonald's. Michael Keaton is the special sauce in this drama, which is also chock full of fascinating fast-food history. Nick Offerman and John Carroll Lynch play the forgotten McDonald brothers. Read our review here.

"The Mummy"

Tom Cruise plays a modern-day tomb raider in
Photo Credit: Universal PIctures / Chiabella James

Tom Cruise plays a modern-day tomb raider in the first of Universal Pictures' new monster-movie franchise. This is the rare movie that seems objectively, indisputably bad, a crowd-displeasing mix of dark horror, "hip" comedy and CGI overload. With several more pictures in the works, this series has nowhere to go but up. Read our review here.

"Gold"

A modern-day prospector (Matthew McConaughey) risks everything to
Photo Credit: Patrick Brown

A modern-day prospector (Matthew McConaughey) risks everything to drill in Indonesia, only to discover that Wall Street has designs on his treasure. It's a semi-true story and only semi-convincing, but it's mostly entertaining. With Bryce Dallas Howard and Edgar Ramirez. Read our review here.

"Cars 3"

Owen Wilson returns as the voice of race-car
Photo Credit: Disney/Pixar/Pixar

Owen Wilson returns as the voice of race-car Lightning McQueen, now competing against a newer, faster generation of racers. Critics felt this Disney-Pixar threequel was low on laughs and lacked imagination; one reviewer called it "predictable as an oval track."

"Ghost in the Shell"

Scarlett Johansson, who's been specializing in extra-human roles
Photo Credit: AP

Scarlett Johansson, who's been specializing in extra-human roles lately ("Under the Skin," and "Lucy"), plays a cyborg cop in this flashy but hollow thriller. Hard-core fans of the original Japanese anime may enjoy the live-action spectacle. Read our review here.

"Alien: Covenant"

Ridley Scott augments his
Photo Credit: AP

Ridley Scott augments his "Alien" franchise with this expensive-looking entry starring Michael Fassbender in a dual role as opposing androids. It's an eyepopper, but the familiar storyline and the face-chomping creatures are getting a little worn out. Read our review here.

"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul"

The fourth film in the underrated franchise, based
Photo Credit: Twentieth Century Fox / Daniel McFadden

The fourth film in the underrated franchise, based on Jeff Kinney's children's books, brings in an all-new cast and a disappointing level of bathroom humor. With Jason Drucker and Alicia Silverstone. Read our review here.

"Baywatch"

A big-screen version of the cheesy TV show
Photo Credit: AP/Frank Masi

A big-screen version of the cheesy TV show about crime-fighting lifeguards (Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron). Critics trashed it, but this freewheeling comedy has its moments and has a genuine affection for its source material. With Alexandra Daddario and Priyanka Chopra. Read our review here.

"Transformers: The Last Knight"

Mark Wahlberg returns as the small-town inventor Cade
Photo Credit: Paramount Pictures/Credit: Paramount Pictures

Mark Wahlberg returns as the small-town inventor Cade Yeager in the fifth "Transformers" movie, and this time he's teaming with a sexy Oxford professor (Laura Haddock) to stop the destruction of the world. With its risible Arthurian pretensions, schoolboy-caliber comedy and bloated 149-minute running time, this is the worst film in what was already a series of worsts. Read our review here.

"Annabelle: Creation"

For a horror flick about yet another dead
Photo Credit: TNS / Warner Bros. Entertainment

For a horror flick about yet another dead girl, her creepy doll, a haunted orphanage and so on, this is pretty darn scary. There are plenty of well-done frights and fake-outs, flashes of humor and an appealing young cast. With Stephanie Sigman and Talitha Bateman. Read our review here.

"Atomic Blonde"

Charlize Theron plays an icy-sexy Cold War spy
Photo Credit: Focus Features / Jonathan Prime

Charlize Theron plays an icy-sexy Cold War spy in this stylish, stunt-driven action flick from director David Leitch ("John Wick"). If you're old enough to remember synth-rock, the Berlin Wall and Patrick Nagel posters, this movie could be the best thing that ever happened to you. Read our review here.

"War for the Planet of the Apes"

A vicious war between humans and apes --
Photo Credit: Twentieth Century Fox / Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

A vicious war between humans and apes -- and we aren't the good guys -- makes for one dark piece of entertainment. This is a blockbuster with heft, although Woody Harrelson adds a touch of camp as a Brando-esque military man called The Colonel. Andy Serkis returns as the heroic ape Caesar. Read our review here.

"The Glass Castle"

The true story of Jeanette Walls, a successful
Photo Credit: Lionsgate / Jake Giles Netter

The true story of Jeanette Walls, a successful New York journalist whose impoverished childhood and unstable parents inspired her bestselling memoir of 2005. Brie Larson plays Walls, but the movie's real star is Woody Harrelson as her charismatic, near-feral father. Elegantly directed and co-written by Destin Daniel Cretton (Larson's "Short Term 12"). Read our review here.

"Baby Driver"

Goofy as it sounds, this movie about a
Photo Credit: TriStar Pictures / Wilson Webb

Goofy as it sounds, this movie about a music-loving getaway driver named Baby (Ansel Elgort) is a nonstop blast. Great action sequences, zippy dialogue and high-energy performances from Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx and Jon Hamm. Read our review here.

"The Big Sick"

This straight-from-the-heart comedy is based on the real-life
Photo Credit: AP

This straight-from-the-heart comedy is based on the real-life rocky romance between the Pakistani immigrant comedian Kumail Nanjiani (playing himself) and the American woman who would become his wife (Zoe Kazan). It's an absolute must-see, funny and charming and tender. Directed by Michael Showalter ("Wet Hot American Summer"). Read our review here.

"47 Meters Down"

Claire Holt and Mandy Moore play sisters who
Photo Credit: TNS / Entertainment Studios Motion Pic

Claire Holt and Mandy Moore play sisters who go on vacation in Mexico and decide -- unwisely -- to take a dive in a shark cage. Given the severe limitations of the story, this little survivalist flick isn't bad. Manage your expectations. Read our review here.

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