TODAY'S PAPER
Good Evening
Good Evening
EntertainmentMovies

Craziest Oscar moments of the 21st century

John Travolta, left, at a post-Oscars party, after

John Travolta, left, at a post-Oscars party, after he butchered the pronunciation of Syosset native Idina Menzel's name as he introduced her performance of "Let It Go" during the Academy Awards ceremony on March 2, 2014. Credit: Getty Images / Pascal Le Segretain (left) and Kevin Winter

David Niven's reaction to a streaker's "shortcomings." Björk's swan dress. Snow White dancing with prince not-so-charming Rob Lowe. Those Oscar moments are so last century.

Academy Awards telecasts of the new millennium have kept up the tradition of producing those water cooler moments -- from the marvelous to the mortifying -- that keep viewers coming back each year.

A BERRY GOOD YEAR

Diversity was alive and well at the 2001 awards when "Monster's Ball" star Halle Berry became the first black best actress to win an Oscar for a leading role. And with Denzel Washington's win for "Training Day," it marked the only time African-American performers took both of the top acting prizes.

HOLLYWOODY ALLEN

In 2002, eccentric director Woody Allen received a standing ovation when he made his sole appearance at the Oscars. The occasion: In the wake of 9/11, he introduced a clipfest called "A Love Letter to New York in the Movies."

STEALING A KISS

"The Pianist" star Adrien Brody was a little too keyed up when he accepted his best actor Oscar in 2003. He planted a big, fat smooch square on the lips of presenter Halle Berry, then said to her, "I bet they didn't tell you that [kiss] was in the gift bag."

KATHRYN THE GREAT

In 2009, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win the best director award. Adding to the historic moment: The award was presented to her by Barbra Streisand, who has never been nominated for her directorial efforts.

DIAMONDS AREN'T A BOY'S BEST FRIEND

For the 2011 Oscars, producers thought host Anne Hathaway and James Franco would draw a younger audience. But a gag with Franco dressed in a blond wig and hot pink gown a la Marilyn Monroe in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" was more bomb than bombshell.

CURSE YOU, MELISSA LEO

The actress, who won a supporting actress award for "The Fighter" in 2011, delivered a speech that was hardly a knockout. After thanking several people, she let the heavyweight champion of expletives slip out.

WHAT'S IN A NAME?

John Travolta created quite a stir at last year's Oscarcast when he introduced Syosset native Idina Menzel as "Adele Dazeem" before she performed "Let It Go" from "Frozen." Twitter followers had a field day, but even a year later, Menzel may be the only person to have let it go.

More Entertainment