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Oscars 2018 ceremony highlights

"The Shape of Water" took home the best picture Oscar along with three other honors Sunday night, but the moments between the presentations of the golden statues defined the 90th Academy Awards.

Actresses-turned-activists Mira Sorvino and Ashley Judd brought the #MeToo movement to the Oscars, while Lupita Nyong'o and Kumail Nanjiani used the show to voice their support for immigrants. And Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph joked about the Oscars now being "too black."

Read about these moments, plus the winners and more highlights from the ceremony hosted by Jimmy Kimmel.

Mark Bridges wins the prize for shortest speech

As part of an ongoing gag, Mark Bridges,
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

As part of an ongoing gag, Mark Bridges, who graduated from Stony Brook University and won the award for best costume design for his work in "Phantom Thread," ended the night by being escorted back onstage riding the Jet Ski he won for having the shortest acceptance speech.

The designer was accompanied by Helen Mirren, who presented the watercraft to the audience at the beginning of the ceremony.

'The Shape of Water' wins best picture

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty returned to present
Photo Credit: AP / Invision / Chris Pizzello

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty returned to present the Oscar for best picture, immediately joking about the envelope flub that occurred at last year's ceremony.

After a montage of nominees, Beatty announced correctly that "The Shape of Water" had won. The movie was up for 13 nominations and took home four wins, including best director and best original score.

Director Guillermo del Toro returned to the stage to accept the award, along with the full cast and crew. During his speech, he reminisced on a conversation he had with fellow nominee, Steven Spielberg, who reminded him that winning this award meant he was part of a filmmaker legacy. He concluded by dedicating the award to young filmmakers.

Frances McDormand wins best lead actress

Frances McDormand won the Oscar for best lead
Photo Credit: AP / Invision / Jordan Strauss

Frances McDormand won the Oscar for best lead actress for her work in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri."

"I've got some things to say," McDormand began her acceptance speech and then called on all females nominated for an Oscar to stand in the audience. She expressed her gratitude to all of the nominees and said they all had new ideas that needed funding and encouraged filmmakers to invest in the ideas. She added, "I have two words to leave with you tonight, ladies and gentleman -- inclusion rider."

The actress defeated Sally Hawkins, Margot Robbie, Saoirse Ronan and Meryl Streep.

Gary Oldman wins best lead actor

Gary Oldman, in his second Oscar nomination, won
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

Gary Oldman, in his second Oscar nomination, won the award for best lead actor for his work in "Darkest Hour."

"Darkest Hour" previously won for best makeup and hairstyling, thanks to the extensive work that it took to transform Oldman into Winston Churchill during filming.

The actor beat out Timothée Chalamet, Daniel Day-Lewis, Daniel Kaluuya and Denzel Washington.

Guillermo del Toro wins best director

Guillermo del Toro won the Oscar for best
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

Guillermo del Toro won the Oscar for best director for his work in "The Shape of Water."

It was his first nomination as director and first win in the category, defeating other notable nominees such as Paul Thomas Anderson, Greta Gerwig and Jordan Peele.

Before presenting the award to del Toro, Emma Stone brought attention to the male domination of the category, saying: "These four men and Greta Gerwig created their own masterpieces this year."

'Remember Me' wins best original song

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

"Remember Me," from the animated film "Coco," won the Oscar for best original song. It was performed live onstage, pictured, earlier in the night by Miguel and Natalia Lafourcade.

The song's writers Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez also wrote the international hit "Let It Go" from "Frozen." During their speech, they gave a shout-out to the production of "Frozen" that is opening on Broadway.

'Shape of Water" wins best original score

French composer Alexandre Desplat, pictured, won the Oscar
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alberto E. Rodriguez

French composer Alexandre Desplat, pictured, won the Oscar for best original score for his work in Guillermo del Toro's "The Shape Of Water." Desplat previously won the same award at this year's Golden Globe Awards and won the Oscar in this same category in 2015 for his work on "The Grand Budapest Hotel."

'Blade Runner: 2049' takes home two wins

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

"Blade Runner: 2049" won two of the five awards for which it was nominated: best visual effects and best cinematography.

Visual effects artists Richard R. Hoover, Paul Lambert, Gerd Nefzer, and John Nelson accepted the first award for the film, giving a shout-out to their teams and friends in Montreal, Canada and Germany.

Roger Deakins accepted his first Oscar for best cinematography, breaking his 13-nomination losing streak. The veteran British cinematographer picked up his first nomination for 1994's "The Shawshank Redemption," and was also nominated for his work in "Fargo," "Skyfall" and "Sicario."

'Get Out' wins best original screenplay

Jordan Peele, pictured, accepted the award for best
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alberto E. Rodriguez

Jordan Peele, pictured, accepted the award for best original screenplay for his film, "Get Out," which almost didn't get made.

"I thought no one would ever make this movie," Peele confessed during his acceptance speech, "but I kept coming back to it because I knew if I made this movie that people would hear it and see it."

Peele is the first African-American writer to win in the category and also was nominated for best director. "Get Out" also was nominated in the best picture category.

'Call Me by Your Name' wins best adapted screenplay

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alberto E. Rodriguez

"Call Me by Your Name," adapted from the novel by André Aciman, won the Oscar for best adapted screenplay. Screenwriter James Ivory, pictured, began his speech by thanking the author of the novel and explained that the reason why the film and book had such success was because "whether straight or gay, we've all experienced first love."

The film stars Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer as a 17-year-old and 24-year-old who fall in love during the summer in 1980s Italy.

'The Silent Child' wins best live action short film

British actor and director Chris Overton and British
Photo Credit: EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock / Paul Buck

British actor and director Chris Overton and British actress Rachel Shenton won the Oscar for best live action short film, for "The Silent Child."

The film follows a deaf 4-year-old girl named Libby, who lives in a silent world until a social worker teaches her to use sign language to communicate.

Shenton translated their acceptance speech into American Sign Language while onstage.

#MeToo activists bring attention to the movement

Actresses Ashley Judd, Annabella Sciorra and Salma Hayek
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Actresses Ashley Judd, Annabella Sciorra and Salma Hayek introduced a produced package featuring #MeToo activist Mira Sorvino; Long Islander Yance Ford, the first transgender director to be nominated for an Oscar; and many other pioneers in the industry who talked about the changes Hollywood is undergoing.

Their interviews focused on the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, as well as how women and minority filmmakers are creating films that are shattering stereotypes including "Wonder Woman," "Lady Bird," "The Big Sick," "Get Out" and "Black Panther."

They vowed to continue making more movies that shine a light on perspectives not traditionally showcased in Hollywood and also challenged viewers to go out and make their own movies.

Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph joke, ask if Oscars 'too black'

Presenters Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph took off
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Presenters Tiffany Haddish and Maya Rudolph took off their high heels and engaged in hilarious banter, posing the question: Are the Oscars "too black" now? They followed that up by promising that there were still "many more white people" to come and pointed out that backstage, there were many white people including "white people with headsets" and "white people with clipboards."

Haddish also had an Oscars fashion moment. She strode on stage in a $4,000 white Alexander McQueen dress she's worn publicly at least two other times, widely considered a faux pas in Hollywood. She wore the dress at the premiere of "Girls Trip" in July. She wore it again during her stint as host of "Saturday Night Live" in November -- and dedicated half her opening monologue to it.

'Dunkirk' takes home three wins

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

"Dunkirk" had multiple wins during the evening, taking home awards for sound editing, sound mixing and film editing.

Sound engineers Mark Weingarten, left, Gregg Landaker, center, and Gary A. Rizzo accepted the award for sound mixing, thanking director Christopher Nolan for encouraging them to create a soundtrack that made a difference. Sound designer Richard King accepted the award for sound editing. "Baby Driver" actors Ansel Elgort and Eiza Gonzalez presented both awards.

Later on in the evening, Nolan's collaborator Lee Smith accepted the award for film editing. When music was plated to usher him off the stage, he joked: "I'm an editor, I should be able to do this very quickly."

Oscars entourage surprises moviegoers

In an effort to show their appreciation to
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

In an effort to show their appreciation to people who go to the movies, Oscar host Jimmy Kimmel and "Wonder Woman" star Gal Gadot barged into the TCL Chinese Theater across the street, which was showing a preview of Disney's "A Wrinkle in Time," and interrupted the film to say "thank you."

They were joined by other Oscar attendees Margot Robbie, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Emily Blunt and Guillermo del Toro, who gave out snacks including 6-foot-long deli heros and hot dogs, which were shot out of cannons.

Sufjan Stevens performs 'Mystery of Love'

For the third performance of the evening, Sufjan
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

For the third performance of the evening, Sufjan Stevens rose up from beneath the stage to perform "Mystery of Love," an original song from "Call Me by Your Name," which was nominated for best picture. Stevens was also joined by a number of other artists including St. Vincent, and frequent collaborators Casey Foubert and James McAlister.

'Coco' wins best animated film

Photo Credit: AP / Invision / Jordan Strauss

"Coco" won the award for best animated feature film, shortly after Miguel and Natalia Lafourcade performed the hit song "Remember Me" from the film.

The Disney and Pixar collaboration tells the story of a Mexican boy who dreams of being a musician despite his family's wishes. The film also has drawn widespread praise for the culturally authentic way it presents Mexico's "Day of the Dead" culture.

Kobe Bryant wins an Oscar

Less than two years after retiring from the
Photo Credit: AP / Invision / Jordan Strauss

Less than two years after retiring from the NBA, Kobe Bryant is now an Oscar winner.

His "Dear Basketball" won the Oscar for animated short film. Bryant, its writer, and director Glen Keane accepted the award. "As basketball players, we're supposed to shut up and dribble," Bryant joked before adding, "I'm glad we're doing much more than that."

Bryant went backstage and told reporters, "I feel better than winning a championship, to be honest with you. I swear I do."

'Star Wars' takes over the ceremony

Photo Credit: Getty Images / Mark Ralston

"Star Wars" fan were treated to an intergalactic surprise when BB-8 rolled out onstage to join Mark Hamill, Oscar Isaac and Kelly Marie Tran to present the awards for best animated short film and best animated film. The cast interpreted the robot's beeps to joke as they presented with Isaac, saying, "BB-8 wants to know why he's the only one not dressed in a tuxedo."

"Star Wars: The Last Jedi" was nominated for four awards during the night, though the film franchise has not taken home a win since 1981.

Allison Janney wins best supporting actress

Allison Janney took home the award for best
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Matt Petit

Allison Janney took home the award for best supporting actress for her caustic portrayal of Tonya Harding's mother, LaVona Harding, in "I, Tonya," a film about the figure skater's life. It was Janney's first Oscar nomination and first win.

The actress started her acceptance speech by joking, "I did it all by myself." She quickly changed, of course, saying, "Nothing could be further from the truth."

LI's Rita Moreno presents best foreign language film

Long Island-raised Rita Moreno, who won an Oscar
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

Long Island-raised Rita Moreno, who won an Oscar for best supporting actress in 1962 for her work in "West Side Story," presented the award for best foreign language film -- wearing her 1962 dress. "A Fantastic Woman," a nomination from Chile, took home the award.

Director Sebastián Lelio accepted the award for the film, which stars transgender actress Daniela Vega as a woman who faces acrimony and scrutiny after the death of her lover. Lelio called Vega the inspiration for the film.

'The Shape of Water' wins for production design

Production designers Jeff Melvin, Paul Denham Austerberry and
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

Production designers Jeff Melvin, Paul Denham Austerberry and Shane Vieau accepted the award for best production design for "The Shape of Water," the film with the most nominations of the night.

Lupita Nyong'o and Kumail Nanjiani call attention to immigration

Lupita Nyong'o and Kumail Nanjiani represented Kenya, Pakistan
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Lupita Nyong'o and Kumail Nanjiani represented Kenya, Pakistan "and Iowa" while presenting the award for production design, bringing attention to immigration and "Dreamers."

Nyong'o spoke about aspirations and told viewers, "Dreams are the foundation of Hollywood, and dreams are the foundation of America." Before presenting the award, Nanjiani added, "To all the dreamers out there, we stand with you."

Mary J. Blige performs 'Mighty River'

Mary J. Blige performed
Photo Credit: AP / Invision / Chris Pizzello

Mary J. Blige performed "Mighty River" from "Mudbound." "Mighty River" and Mary J. Blige were nominated for best original song and best supporting actress, respectively.

'Icarus' wins for best documentary

Producer Dan Cogan and director Bryan Fogel accepted
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Frazer Harrison

Producer Dan Cogan and director Bryan Fogel accepted the award for best documentary feature for their work on "Icarus," a Netflix original movie. The film tells the story of a doping program used by Russian athletes through accounts from the man who says he oversaw it.

"Icarus" beat out "Strong Island," a film directed by Long Islander Yance Ford about the the 1992 murder of William Ford and its aftermath on Long Island, which was nominated in the same category.

Mark Bridges accepts best costume design

Mark Bridges, a Stony Brook University graduate, accepted
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Fredrick J. Brown

Mark Bridges, a Stony Brook University graduate, accepted the award for best costume design for his work in "Phantom Thread," Paul Thomas Anderson's film starring Daniel Day-Lewis as a fastidious fashion designer in 1950's London. Bridges kept his speech at a brief 36 seconds, perhaps hoping to win the Jet Ski that host Jimmy Kimmel promised to the person who made the shortest acceptance speech. Bridges is a now a two-time winner having won the costume design Oscar for the 2011 best picture winner "The Artist."

'Darkest Hour' wins for best makeup and hairstyling

Makeup artists Kazuhiro Tsuji, left, Lucy Sibbick and
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Makeup artists Kazuhiro Tsuji, left, Lucy Sibbick and David Malinowski accepted the award for best makeup and hairstyling for "Darkest Hour." Tsuji was the artist behind Gary Oldman's transformation into Winston Churchill, a process which Oldman told Vanity Fair took "200 hours in the makeup chair" throughout filming.

Sam Rockwell wins best supporting actor

Sam Rockwell's won the first award of the
Photo Credit: AP

Sam Rockwell's won the first award of the night, for best supporting actor. The award was presented to him for his portrayal of a racist sheriff's deputy in "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri."

Rockwell's acceptance speech began with a joke about possibly winning a Jet Ski for making the shortest speech and then focused on his love of movies, which he says his father helped foster by pulling him out of school to go see a film.

Helen Mirren presents a Jet Ski prize

Jimmy Kimmel offered a free Jet Ski to
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Jimmy Kimmel offered a free Jet Ski to person who gives the shortest speech of the night. As Helen Mirren presented the personal watercraft in a "Price Is Right" fashion, Kimmel added that the legendary actress was "not included."

Jimmy Kimmel opens the 90th Academy Awards

Jimmy Kimmel opened the 90th Academy Award by
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Jimmy Kimmel opened the 90th Academy Award by telling winners to pause a beat before coming up to the stage.

The ceremony host's joke was a reference to last year's mix-up in announcing the best picture. He also poked fun at accounting firm PwC, which caused the error. Kimmel said he turned down a skit on the accountants last year, and the mistaken reading of "La La Land" was a result of the accountants trying to do comedy.

The late-night TV host also referenced the sexual harassment scandal that has roiled Hollywood, mentioning disgraced film mogul Harvey Weinstein by name and saying he deserved to be expelled from the academy most of all. He also gave a shout-out to the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, saying the audience could expect to hear more about them later in the show.

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