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In this video, it's parody time in 'Nassau'

Screengrab from YouTube video,

Screengrab from YouTube video, "Nassau (County) State of Mind," a parody about Nassau County wealthy lifestyles by Tyler Gildin, 20, of Woodmere, Evan Krumholz, 21, of Old Westbury, Cody Milch, 21, of Hewlett, and Nash Prince, 21, of Woodbury. Credit: Handout

According to four local college students, many outsiders see residents of Nassau County as either being spoiled or out of touch with reality.

The quartet decided to mock these and other stereotypes by creating a video meant for friends. It soon became much more.

Tyler Gildin, 20, of Woodmere, Evan Krumholz, 21, of Old Westbury, Cody Milch, 21, of Hewlett, and Nash Prince, 21, of Woodbury, present the ups and downs of Nassau County living in their hit YouTube parody, "Nassau (County) State of Mind."

Some ethnic groups might be offended by the obscenity-laced lyrics - sung to Jay-Z's "Empire State of Mind." The 4-minute, 17-second video mock's the stereotype of being spoiled and wealthy, with references to Bentleys, Ugg boots, iPhones, sleepaway camps and expensive university tuition.

"I heard 'Empire State of Mind' and thought I could write funny lyrics pertaining to me," says Gildin, a Syracuse University student. "We pretty much picked the main places that anyone would be able to recognize."

The group name-dropped local favorites, from Tamburino's Deli and The Cheese Store in Cedarhurst, to Kitchen Kabaret in Roslyn Heights.

The guys had a goal of 5,000 views and figured its popularity would die down after their friends watched. But the video had received nearly 300,000 views at press time, helped by a segment that aired on a WNBC/4 newscast.

The video is intended to be a parody.

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"If you were to take the video literally, it would make us seem provincial, but we are acknowledging and mocking a stereotype," says Milch, a University of Wisconsin student who directed it.

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