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Lil Peep disses Long Beach on new single from posthumous album

Lil Peep attends the Balmain Menswear Spring/Summer 2018

Lil Peep attends the Balmain Menswear Spring/Summer 2018 show as part of Paris Fashion Week on June 24, 2017. Credit: Getty Images / Pascal Le Segretain

Lil Peep lashes out at Long Beach in his new single “Cry Alone,” released Thursday as part of the announcement of the late rapper’s upcoming album “Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2” set for a Nov. 9 release.

“I hate everybody in my hometown,” Lil Peep sings. “I wanna burn my old high school into the ground. I hate everybody in my hometown. Tell the rich kids to look at me now.”

The video for “Cry Alone,” also released Thursday, includes shots of Lil Peep from his Long Beach High School yearbook. Lil Peep, whose real name was Gustav Ahr, died in November 2017 of a drug overdose while on tour in Arizona. He was 21.

At the memorial service for Lil Peep, his mother, Liza Womack, talked about her son and his anger at many in Long Beach.

“Gus understood that many good people suffered injustice because of what they look like or how much money they had,” Womack said. “He saw how the cool kids who lived in the fancy neighborhoods looked down on his friends who lived in the projects and looked down on his own family who lived in an apartment and drove an old Nissan … Gus wrote a song about wanting to burn his high school down. He didn’t like most of the adults there. He despised the social scene.”

In a statement, Womack said “Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2” is a “powerful collection of songs.” “Because Gus had such an indominable [sic] work ethic and commitment to getting things right, we are blessed with another chance to hear his voice — interwoven with the production of two of his trusted music collaborators,” Womack said, referring to musicians Smokeasac and George Astasio of IIVI.

Since his death, there has been more interest in Lil Peep, who combined elements of emo and hip-hop. His single “Falling Down” with the late rapper XXXtentacion reached No. 13 on the pop charts earlier this month.

“Gus was my best friend,” Smokeasac said in a statement. “Finishing (the album) without him is the hardest thing I have ever had to do. At times I didn’t want to finish it, some days it was just too hard to hear his voice and not have him right there beside me. But when I got out of my own head, I could feel him there and that and his incredible fans are what got me through it. I really had no choice, it had to be done and I am proud of what George and I have done for Gus and his fans.”

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