TODAY'S PAPER
40° Good Morning
40° Good Morning
EntertainmentMusic

LI's Pat Benatar falls short of Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction; Whitney Houston leads 2020 class

Pat Benatar performs in 2019, left, and Whitney

Pat Benatar performs in 2019, left, and Whitney Houston performs in 2003 in a composite image. Credit: Composite: Eric McCandless via Getty Images, left; Getty Images / Frank Micelotta

Posthumous inductees Whitney Houston and The Notorious B.I.G. will lead a new class into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, joined by Depeche Mode, the Doobie Brothers, Nine Inch Nails and T-Rex.

The gospel-trained Houston, whose soaring voice transformed the Dolly Parton cover "I Will Always Love You" into a gigantic hit, was one of four artists elected after being on the ballot for the first time. The Doobie Brothers, Biggie and T-Rex were the others.

If there’s a surprise in this year’s group of inductees it is that just one of the artists chosen — The Doobie Brothers — reached the top five of the hall’s fan voting. The other most popular nominees were the Dave Matthews Band, which logged just over 1 million fan votes followed by Lindenhurst native Pat Benatar (882,000 votes), the Doobies (nearly 785,000), Soundgarden (just under 723,000) and Judas Priest (675,000).

The top five vote-getters on the fan ballot generate just one vote apiece for each of those acts, which is added to the total from the hall’s 1,000 or so voting members. But the fan poll demonstrates to voters which acts those fans are most enthusiastic about.

The annual induction ceremony will take place May 2 at the Public Auditorium in Cleveland, the city where the rock museum is located. The Saturday night show will be on HBO, televised live for the first time.

Houston, who succumbed to years of drug abuse in 2012, was an instant success after being signed to a record contract at age 19. Her 1985 debut had three No. 1 singles: "Saving All My Love for You," "How Will I Know" and "The Greatest Love of All." She had seven consecutive singles top the charts, a first for any artist.

As the daughter of gospel singer Cissy Houston and cousin of Dionne Warwick, Whitney Houston grew up in the business.

Exclusive subscription offer

Newsday covers the stories that matter most to Long Islanders. We dig deep to uncover the facts, hold the powerful in check and keep a watchful eye on Long Island.

Your digital subscription, starting at $1, supports local journalism vital to the community.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

The imposing, Brooklyn-born rap artist Christopher Wallace took on the identities of The Notorious B.I.G. and Biggie Smalls and was massively influential as rap became music's dominant style in the 1990s. With hits like "Juicy" and "Big Poppa," he was the leader of an East Coast school of rap that found itself in a bitter rivalry with artists from the West Coast.

He was killed in a still-unsolved drive-by shooting in Los Angeles at age 24 in 1997. On the album, "Life After Death," with hits like "Mo Money Mo Problems" and "Hypnotize," he became the first artist to earn multiple No. 1 singles after his death.

Depeche Mode remains active, but its biggest influence came in the 1980s, when its post-punk, synthesizer-dominated music made the Brits a favorite of the goth subculture. Hits included "Personal Jesus," "Just Can't Get Enough" and "Enjoy the Silence."

Depeche Mode shares with fellow inductees Nine Inch Nails the honor of having one of their signature songs covered by country legend Johnny Cash, who recorded "Personal Jesus" and NIN's "Hurt" during his late-career resurgence.

With songs like "Closer," NIN was a leader of the industrial rock movement in the 1990s. Like Green Day, a memorable performance in the mud at Woodstock '94 brought them a wider audience. Leader Trent Reznor has become a go-to soundtrack producer in addition to his continued work with Nine Inch Nails.

The Doobie Brothers weren't critical favorites, but they had some indelible rock hits in the 1970s, including "Listen to the Music," "Black Water" and "China Grove." They're embarking on a 50th anniversary tour this summer, bringing members Michael McDonald, Pat Simmons, Tom Johnston and John McFee together for the first time in 25 years, and a rock hall induction makes for perfect publicity.

The British band T-Rex was known primarily for its 1970s hit "Bang a Gong (Get It On)" and, to a lesser extent, "Jeepster." The death of leader Marc Bolan in 1977 ended the band.

The two nonperforming inductees may be able to bring some star power with them. Music manager Irving Azoff has watched the finances for several bands, but is best-known as the manager of the Eagles since 1974. Jon Landau is a former music journalist, known for an indelible line when he saw a concert by a little-known artist in 1974: "I saw rock 'n' roll's future and its name is Bruce Springsteen." Shortly thereafter, he became Springsteen's manager, a job he still holds today.

Tickets for the induction ceremony go on sale Feb. 27. Performers will be announced at a later date.

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

More Entertainment