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Rolling Stones return to Hyde Park

The Rolling Stones returned to London's Hyde Park after 44 years with a concert that saluted both the band's past and the fleetingly idyllic English summer. Mick Jagger even donned a frock for the occasion.

The band played an outdoor gig for 65,000 people Saturday in the same venue as a landmark 1969 show performed two days after the death of founding member Brian Jones, The Associated Press reports.

It's most often remembered for the vast crowd of more than 200,000, for Jagger quoting Percy Bysshe Shelley as eulogy to Jones -- and for the white dress Jagger wore onstage.

Much else has changed since 1969. Then, the concert was free. On Saturday, some fans had paid $300 a ticket. Jagger turns 70 this month, drummer Charlie Watts is 72, and guitarist Keith Richards is 69.

Fresh off a headlining slot at the Glastonbury Festival last week, the band was in relaxed but rousing form during a set that kicked off with "Start Me Up" and "It's Only Rock 'n' Roll (But I Like It)."

"Anybody here that was here in 1969?" Jagger asked, getting at least a few affirmative shouts. "Welcome back -- it's nice to see you again."

The park was already a leafy idyll on a rare London day of bright sunshine and soaring temperatures.

"This time of year in England, it's the best place to be in the world," Jagger said, before quoting Shakespeare: "Summer's lease has all too short a date."

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