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'Bohemian Rhapsody' triumphs at Golden Globes, taking best dramatic film in big upset

Sandra Oh, who made history as the first Asian actress to co-host a Globes ceremony, also took home a best-actress award for "Killing Eve."

Rami Malek accepts the Golden Globe for best

Rami Malek accepts the Golden Globe for best actor in a motion picture drama Sunday night for his role as Queen frontman Freddie Mercury in "Bohemian Rhapsody," which also won the night's top award, best dramatic film. Photo Credit: NBCUniversal via Getty Images

In an upset, “Bohemian Rhapsody” triumphed at Sunday night's Golden Globes, winning the top award of best dramatic picture. The widely panned biopic about the flamboyant rock singer Freddie Mercury beat “A Star is Born” and the popular favorite, “Black Panther.”

Meanwhile, "Green Book" won three awards, for best comedy, screenplay and Mahershala Ali as supporting actor. Ali praised the real-life figure he played, Don Shirley, a black musician who toured the segregated South in the early 1960s, as “a brilliant man, and I just want to thank him for his passion and virtuosity and the dignity that he carried himself with.”

Sandra Oh, who became the first actress of Asian descent to co-host the Golden Globes ceremony Sunday night, also took home the award for best actress for the dramatic series “Killing Eve.”

“There are two people here tonight that I’m so grateful that they’re here with me. I’d like to thank my mother and my father,” an overwhelmed Oh, a Canadian native, said in an emotional speech. She also briefly spoke Korean to them, saying she loves them. “I have no idea what’s happening,” a dazed-looking Oh said later, holding the award to her chest.

Another emotional moment occurred when Regina King won best supporting actress in Barry Jenkins' literary adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk.” She noted that while the public may be tired of hearing celebrities “on our soapbox,” she used her time to promise that all her future producing projects would hire 50 percent women. “I just challenge anyone out there who is in a position of power, not just in our industry, in all industries, I challenge you to challenge yourselves and stand with us in solidarity,” she said.

The theme of this year's Globes was diversity, with three films featuring largely black casts nominated for best dramatic picture.

The ceremony, though, struck a consciously light and breezy tone. Hosts Oh and Andy Samberg avoided President Donald Trump's name and tiptoed around potentially explosive subjects. “We're the only two people in Hollywood who haven't gotten in trouble for saying something offensive,” Oh said, and the two hosts kept it that way, too. They pretend-roasted various celebrities by heaping praise on them (Oh to Bradley Cooper: “You are hot!”) and pretend-forced Jim Carrey — a nominee for best comedic actor in the Showtime series “Kidding” — to move his seat from the movie-star section to the television-star section.

Oh struck a serious note with a heartfelt speech to the women and minority groups in the room. “I wanted to be here to look out in this audience and witness this moment of change,” she said. “I see you, all these faces of change. And now, so will everyone else.”

Lady Gaga, onstage to accept the award for best original song — for “Shallow,” from “A Star is Born” — thanked her male co-writers, including Mark Ronson, for their help. “As a woman, it is really hard to be taken seriously as a musician and a songwriter,” she said. “They lifted me up, they supported me.”

Even the category of best animated film seemed more culturally significant than usual when “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” won the award. The film, about an Afro-Hispanic teenager who takes on the Spidey mantle, has been a box-office success and a surprise hit with critics.

“We were trying to make a movie that goes to the idea that anyone can be behind the mask,” said Peter Ramsey, the film's African-American co-director. “We’re counting on you — you can do it!”

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