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Ice cream bread recipes: 6 different ways to make it

Self-rising flour and a pint of ice cream

Self-rising flour and a pint of ice cream are the essential ingredients in this loaf cake. Credit: Eve Bishop

A notable percentage of Americans are avoiding wheat and going gluten-free. But you wouldn’t know it from my pantry. Not only do I keep all-purpose flour on hand, I have sacks of whole-wheat flour, bread flour, cake flour and semolina. And recently, I couldn’t resist adding to my flour collection when I spotted self-rising flour at the supermarket.

Self-rising flour is flour that already has baking powder and salt mixed in. It’s traditional in Southern baking, used to make high-rising biscuits, quick muffins and delicate cakes. This flour is relatively low in protein, producing exceptionally tender baked goods. Convenience combined with this quality makes it hard for an avid baker to resist. Waffles, muffins, shortcakes, scones, and Hush Puppies are all quicker to mix and remarkably fluffy when made with self-rising flour. Combine self-rising flour with a little bit of milk and you have dumplings for your chicken. To make chili with corn dumplings, mix self-rising flour, corn meal and milk and drop them in the pot. Cover and then steam until done.

Southern brands such as White Lily and Martha White are available online and in some local supermarkets. Gold Medal and Pillsbury also make self-rising flour. You can also make your own self-rising blend. The proportions are 1 cup of flour to 1 1⁄2 teaspoons baking powder and 1⁄2 teaspoon salt. Double, triple or quadruple as necessary. Using 100 percent all-purpose flour in this mix will produce a slightly tougher crust and less tender crumb than Southern-style self-rising flour. To get a softer mixture, substitute 2 tablespoons of cornstarch for 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour in every cup that you use.

After producing a batch of biscuits in minutes from the recipe on the back of my flour sack, I wondered what to make next. Searching online for ideas, I read rave reviews for something called “ice cream bread,” a lightly sweetened loaf cake made with a pint of ice cream and a cup and a half of self-rising flour. I tried it and it was pretty impressive for a 2-ingredient recipe. With the addition of just a few more ingredients I thought it could be really great. So I threw in just a little extra sugar, some flaked coconut, and some mini chocolate chips.

It also would be easy to modify the basic recipe in the following ways:

Maple walnut 1 pint maple walnut ice cream, 1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1⁄2 cup toasted and chopped walnuts, 1⁄2 teaspoon maple extract

Chocolate-peanut butter 1 pint chocolate ice cream, 1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1⁄2 cup semisweet chocolate chips, 1⁄2 cup peanut butter chips, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Coffee-toffee 1 pint coffee ice cream, 1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 cup chopped Skor or Heath bars, 1 teaspoon instant espresso powder

Lemon-blueberry 1 pint vanilla ice cream, 1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 teaspoon lemon zest, 1 1⁄2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries

Confetti 1 pint vanilla ice cream, 1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1⁄2 cup multicolored sprinkles

 

COCONUT-CHIP ICE-CREAM BREAD

Full-fat ice cream is essential here for a moist, flavorful result.

1 pint full-fat vanilla ice cream

1 1⁄2 cups self-rising flour

1 tablespoon sugar

1⁄2 teaspoon coconut extract

1⁄2 cup mini chocolate chips

1⁄2 cup sweetened flaked coconut

1. Preheat the oven to 350. Spray an 8-inch-by-4-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray. Let ice cream soften on the countertop for 10 to 15 minutes (don’t let it melt).

2. Combine the ice cream, flour, sugar and coconut extract in a large bowl and mix until just moistened. Mix in the chocolate chips and coconut.

3. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the bread comes out with just a few crumbs attached, 50 to 55 minutes. Let stand on a wire rack in the pan for 10 minutes, invert onto the rack, re-invert, and let cool completely before slicing and serving.

Makes one loaf, 6 to 8 servings.

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