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Bald dolls for kids with cancer

Kids going through chemotherapy will soon have popular

Kids going through chemotherapy will soon have popular Bratz and Moxie dolls to play with that mirror one of the biggest cosmetic challenges the kids face: losing their hair. The six bald but beautiful versions of the dolls are due out in June. Credit: Handout

Kids going through chemotherapy will soon have popular Bratz and Moxie dolls that mirror one of the biggest cosmetic challenges the kids face -- losing their hair.

The six bald-but-beautiful versions of the dolls are due out in June. They will cost $14.99 each, with 10 percent of the cost going to City of Hope, a Los Angeles-based cancer-research center, says Isaac Larian, chief executive of MGA Entertainment, which created the dolls.

The True Hope line is a response to a Facebook campaign by moms of sick children who asked toy-makers to create a bald doll, Larian says. The page -- called "Beautiful and Bald Barbie! Let's see if we can get it made" -- has close to 150,000 "likes."

"People want to buy dolls that are a reflection of who they are," he says. "I don't think these dolls are ugly. They're pretty." The line includes boy and girl dolls that come with hats and courage beads.

Gina Mulieri, 12, of Holbrook, who has had cancer for six years, says she is happy to see bald dolls and not just because they're good for kids with cancer. She's hoping kids who don't have cancer will play with them as well and develop empathy.

Her mom, Bonnie, agrees. "I can't tell you the amount of isolation socially that these kids feel because they're sick and they don't look like their peers," she says. The dolls would be great, she says.

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