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Hallmark Mother's Day cards through the years

Mother's Day became an official holiday in 1914, when President Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation naming the second Sunday in May as a day for "public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country."

In the early 1920s, Hallmark began creating and producing Mother's Day cards. The greeting cards illustrated how mom's roles changed through the years. Here, we take a look back at Mother's Day cards from the 1920s through today.

1920s

What cards lacked in color, they made up
Photo Credit: Hallmark

What cards lacked in color, they made up for in formality. In the 1920s, color was hand-applied rather than printed.

1930s

This 1930s card highlights a mother in the
Photo Credit: Hallmark

This 1930s card highlights a mother in the kitchen, baking with her little one.

1930s

Mother's Day wishes came with a spot of
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Mother's Day wishes came with a spot of hot tea and some pretty flowers.

1940s

No grande mocha latte for the mom receiving
Photo Credit: Hallmark

No grande mocha latte for the mom receiving this coffeepot card, which pictured a few of the roles society expected of her in the 1940s.

1940s

A pin cushion, a thimble and other familiar
Photo Credit: Hallmark

A pin cushion, a thimble and other familiar icons of the sewing basket conveyed best wishes for mom in this 1940s card.

1950s

Bears, raccoons and cats portraying human qualities were
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Bears, raccoons and cats portraying human qualities were common greeting card characters for all occasions in the 1950s, including Mother's Day.

1950s

A gingham-themed tea party shared love for mom
Photo Credit: Hallmark

A gingham-themed tea party shared love for mom in this decade.

1960s

Who taught you how to behave?
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Who taught you how to behave? "Nobody!" said the inside of this rebellious Mother's Day card. "But I gotta give you credit, Mom. You tried like #($&(."

1960s

Remember that prim and proper 1920s mom? She
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Remember that prim and proper 1920s mom? She burst out of her shell in the 1960s, with this card telling mom to do something "adventurous, wicked and daring on Mother's Day."

1970s

Moms from any era can relate to this
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Moms from any era can relate to this card acknowledging that household chores rarely take a day off -- even on Mother's Day.

1970s

Office scenes began to appear in 1970s Mother's
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Office scenes began to appear in 1970s Mother's Day cards as more women, including women with children, began working outside the home.

1980s

The Mahogany card line debuted in the 1980s,
Photo Credit: Hallmark

The Mahogany card line debuted in the 1980s, and with it many more choices recognizing African-American moms for Mother's Day and all occasions.

1990s

Photo Credit: Hallmark

"Happy Mother's Day to Mom, the original seat belt," said this card for Moms from every decade who know this move.

In the 1990s, greeting cards also started to recognize that Mother's Day wasn't always happy for those who have suffered a loss or are going through a difficult time.

2000s

Moms-to-be could now receive cards for their very
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Moms-to-be could now receive cards for their very first Mother's Day.

2000s

No baking or sewing images to honor the
Photo Credit: Hallmark

No baking or sewing images to honor the fashionable 21st century mom in the 2000s.

2010s

It looks like a regular card, but hold
Photo Credit: Hallmark

It looks like a regular card, but hold this one up to a webcam and watch it come to life through augmented reality technology -- a 2010 feature that would amaze moms from previous decades!

2010s

Mom isn't always perfect -- but in the
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Mom isn't always perfect -- but in the 2010s, we were willing to laugh about the challenges in the new millennium.

2010s

Here, an image of a 2016 greeting card
Photo Credit: Hallmark

Here, an image of a 2016 greeting card you can find at Hallmark or on Hallmark.com.

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